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Session Speaker(s)/Presenter(s) Description
Accessible Library Web Content: A Hands-On Approach to Getting Started
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Morgan Steele
Director of Web and Creative Strategy
Central Carolina Community College

The Community and Junior College Libraries Section (CJCLS) of NCLA and the North Carolina Community College Library Association (NCCCLA) invite library staff from all types of libraries to learn how to develop accessible library web content for their patrons. Realizing that some libraries may not have anyone on their campus or at their institution with expertise in the area of creating accessible web content, we will provide participants an opportunity to work with Morgan Steele, Director of Web and Creative Strategy at Central Carolina Community College, in a half-day pre-conference workshop. This workshop will offer practical tools and hands-on experience in evaluating library web content. Library staff attending this session should gain the confidence to face challenges as they strive to meet campus, state, and federal accessibility standards. In this hands-on workshop participants will:

  • Learn to recognize the basic features of accessible web content.
  • Evaluate a portion of their library’s web content for accessibility using freely available tools.
  • Acquire best practices for creating accessible LibGuides (version 2) and various types of library tutorials.
  • Review the Web Accessibility Checklist and begin developing a library accessibility plan.

By the end of this session, participants will gain new skills in order to help provide accessible library web content to their patrons.

Presenter Bio:
Morgan Steele is the Director of Web and Creative Strategy for Central Carolina Community College (CCCC). He has spent over ten years in the web industry with more than seven years embedded in the NC education system. His innovative creation of a CCCC multi-platform website, mobile application, and an award-winning logo, earned him recognition as the 2014-2015 CCCC “Staff Person of the Year.” Morgan is committed to simplicity and passionate about crafting clear, engaging, effective communications both online and off.

A Librarian, an Archivist, and a Professor walk into . . . a Collaboration that Matters
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Patrick Rudd
Coordinator of Instruction and Outreach
Belk Library, Elon University
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Shaunta Alvarez
Archives Librarian
Belk Library, Elon University

At Elon University, an Instruction Librarian and an Archives Librarian collaborated with teaching faculty to provide process-oriented learning opportunities with the unique collections housed in Belk Library's Archives and Special Collections Department.  In this session, you will learn how this organic instruction model has worked with Education and English classes.  Discover ways that this integrated practice can enhance teaching with primary sources and create meaningful collaborative opportunities between librarians, archivists and teaching faculty.

A Library for the Whole Student: Creating a Multidimensional Culture of Health & Wellness at your Library
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Hubert Womack
Instruction and Outreach Librarian
Z. Smith Reynolds Library - Wake Forest University
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Meghan Webb
Reference Services Coordinator
Z. Smith Reynolds Library, Wake Forest University
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Susan Smith
Associate Dean
Wake Forest University/Z. Smith Reynolds Library
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Mary Beth Lock
Director of Access Services
Z. Smith Reynolds Library

Across the country, colleges and universities are launching robust wellness initiatives to meet the needs of their students, faculty and staff.  In recent years, Universities from Stanford to Vanderbilt have launched such wellness initiatives to promote healthy living choices through outreach and programming efforts, and empower community members to advance health and wellness priorities. Join this panel of librarians from the Z. Smith Reynolds Library at Wake Forest University as we examine the role of the library in larger wellbeing initiatives, and the value that libraries can bring to these programs. 

The ZSR Library has introduced programming to encourage holistic health and wellness through eight dimensions of wellbeing, as defined by Thrive, Wake Forest University’s comprehensive welling program. These eight dimensions comprise the core pillars of the Thrive Initiative, and include emotional, environmental, financial, intellectual, occupational, physical, social, and spiritual wellbeing.  With programs ranging from recreational events like “Capture the Flag” and “Humans v. Zombies” to involvement with campus-wide health initiatives such as flu shot clinics, the ZSR Library has embraced multidimensional health and wellness, and incorporates activities and services to cultivate healthier, balanced lives. 

A Place in the Sun: Cleaning up Online Content with the LibGuides Summer Project
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Katy Kavanagh Webb
Head, Research and Instructional Services
Joyner Library, East Carolina University

The Head of Research and Instructional Services at East Carolina University’s Joyner Library has attempted to address issues with out-of-date content in LibGuides by conducting an annual group cleanup project during the lull in classroom instruction occurring over the summer. The LibGuides Summer Project has taken place at Joyner Library over the last four summers and has resulted in fewer broken links, improved content, as well as a more unified look and feel. At the beginning of the summer, a lesson plan for the project is provided by the project leader to the participants. The lesson plan uses the instructional concept of scaffolding, resulting in sessions that build upon themselves and become more complex as the project progresses. During weekly departmental meetings, the project leader presents that week’s 15-minute lesson, including hands-on instruction, in a library classroom. The librarians are given one to two weeks to apply the lesson to their own guides. A weekly “LibGuides Office Hour” offering optional one-on-one guided help is provided by the project leader a few days later for those having trouble applying new concepts. The LibGuides Summer Project can last as few as six weeks or stretch to fill up the summer with twelve lessons. Examples of clean-up lessons for the LibGuides Summer Project include checking for broken links, reviewing statistics, and fixing widgets if you have recently made changes to your systems or website. This poster will give more tips and outline how to conduct a summer cleanup of LibGuides at any institution.

Academic Library Websites as Information Gateways: Prioritizing User Needs in Website Evaluation and (Re)Design
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Terry W. Brandsma
Information Technology Librarian
UNC Greensboro, University Libraries

As the virtual presence of academic libraries continues to grow, it is increasingly important to ensure that these websites are highly accessible, efficient, and, above all, usable. Usability is a quality attribute that measures how easy or difficult it is for users to navigate user interfaces based upon a variety of factors. The last major redesign of the UNCG Libraries’ website occurred in 2008. Since then, minor enhancements have been made, but no formal evaluation had been conducted to determine overall usability or satisfaction. This presentation will outline the methods and results of the year-long study that examined the design, content, and functionality of the UNCG Libraries’ primary website. Formal usability testing methods - including online card sorting, logfile analysis, task-based usability sessions, focus groups, and surveys - were conducted with the goal of informing later efforts for redesign of the homepage and its direct links. Instrumentation and best practices will be discussed, as well as obstacles that can arise during testing and effective ways to overcome them. Visual displays of the website before and after the 2015 redesign will be presented, and implications for future usability studies will be discussed.  

Access Services as Librarian Launching Pad
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William Gee
Circulation & Interlibrary Loan Librarian
East Carolina University, Joyner Library
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Pam Evans
Assistant Head, Circulation and Interlibrary Loan
Joyner Library, East Carolina University

Recruiting the right staff and mentoring leaders are perhaps among the top priorities of every manager. Joyner Library at East Carolina University has found that these priorities can be effectively combined in Circulation & Interlibrary Loan. We have recruited many staff over the years who have gone on to become librarians and currently have 5 of our 10 employees enrolled in library school. Circulation & ILL has been found to be a perfect training ground to learn about the breadth of libraries and patron services. The session will briefly cover the tasks that are learned through working in Circulation & ILL and how we interview, train, and support our staff on their way to librarian status at ECU and elsewhere. 

Accessing Art
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Breanne Crumpton
GlaxoSmithKline Fellow
North Carolina Museum of Art

Over the years, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) has collected various pieces of artwork for their libraries; however, there hasn’t been a central point in which to access information to answer patron’s questions about the artwork. This poster will look to show the steps taken in creating a Libguide, entitled “Art in the University Libraries at UNCG,” to improve access to common information about the various art pieces on display by providing a single access point available for staff, students, and members of the general public alike.

Advertising and Marketing Government Information
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Elisabeth Garner
Government Information Services Specialist
Randall Library-UNC Wilmington

I plan to display the different methods of marketing and advertising Government Information and Resources to either university or college libraries. Part of my poster display will incorporate ideas I learned about while visiting Oxford University’s Bodleian Library and their Government Information, (Official Papers), collection.  I will also display ideas that we use here at Randall Library, UNC-Wilmington, in our own Government Information collection.  My hope in displaying this poster, and in turn, speaking with Conference attendees about Government Information, is to raise awareness of the value of Government Information in general.  I believe that much of the information we receive at our depository libraries could prove very useful in students’ research and assignments for their classes. I’ve also found in various conversations with our own faculty, that many of them are not aware of just exactly what government documents “are,” and how this type of information could be used, even within their own classrooms.  Therefore, I would like to submit this poster session to be included in the 2015 NCLA Biennial Conference.

Advocacy Made Easy
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Molly Westmoreland
Consultant for Public Library Management, Director NC Center for the Book
State Library of NC

Molly Westmoreland, State Library of NC Consultant for Public Library Management, will present a 1 hour workshops for public library trustees, Friends and Advocates on an easy and effective way to advocate for their public library.  This enjoyable interactive workshop will help remove barriers to effective advocacy efforts by breaking down the process into simple steps than can be accomplished by anyone.

All Conference Reception

Please join us for the All Conference Reception.  While this event is free, please present your ticket for admittance.  Parking is available at the Davis Parking Deck, or attendees may use the bus service provided.  A separate ticket is needed for bus service.

Analyzing Digital Collections Entrances: Why it Matters
Paromita Biswas
Metadata Librarian
Western Carolina University
Joel Marchesoni
Tech Support Analyst
Western Carolina University

Western Carolina University’s Hunter Library has a small digital projects unit. Currently the library has 15 digital collections hosted on CONTENTdm. The collections are available through the library’s CONTENTdm webpages and the majority have been harvested to WorldCat and the Digital Public Library of America which provide additional avenues of access. Only a third of those collections have their own landing pages or websites and the library has not yet experimented with exposing the collections on platforms such as Flickr. This presentation discusses the reach of Hunter Library’s digital collections based on usage data gathered via Google Analytics and CONTENTdm user statistics. The presenters analyze usage data from the library’s collections’ website as well as from WorldCat and DPLA covering a period of approximately 18 months from October 2013 through April 2015. The presentation will demonstrate that such data analysis is useful for understanding digital collections’ usage, that it can be used to highlight the need for exposing digital collections via additional platforms, and that it can provide a valuable perspective to digital initiatives departments when deciding the focus of future digital collections.

And the Data Says…Summer Reading 2015
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Amanda Johnson
Data Analysis and Communication Consultant
State Library of North Carolina
Lori Special

The State Library of North Carolina has been coordinating summer reading programs state wide since 1980. Just last year, the State Library was a pilot partner with Counting Opinions to develop a web application to accurately track summer reading participation, facilitate communication between librarians and participants and encourage participant engagement by allowing them to record reading minutes from anywhere at any time. This presentation by Lori Special, Youth Services Consultant, and Amanda Johnson, Data Analysis and Communication Consultant, will present the goals of the summer reading web application and preliminary findings from summer 2015. We will discuss ways data from the application can be used to evaluate the impact of summer reading programs on literacy and assess the success of summer reading efforts at specific library locations. Examples of advocacy and marketing materials that can be created using summer reading data will be presented as well as tips on communicating results to local school and community leaders.

And the Winner Is … Creating Award-Winning Collaborations to Embed Information Literacy into a General Education Curriculum
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Lisa Coats
First Year Engagement Librarian
University of North Carolina Wilmington - Randall Library
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Anne Pemberton
Associate Director, Library Assessment and Instructional Services
University of North Carolina Wilmington, Randall Library

At the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW), collaboration has been the key to creating an information literacy (IL) program that is embedded into the required general education curriculum. Specifically, this poster will showcase the successful collaborations that have transformed the singular “library session” of First Year Seminar (FYS) into an award-winning, multi-faceted IL “experience” for first year students. Awards include the “Outstanding Partnership Award” given by UNCW’s University College to Randall Library and the “National Resource Center for First-Year Experience and Students in Transition for an Institutional Excellence Award for Students in Transition” presented to UNCW. Collaborations between Randall Library and UNCW’s University College, the general education advisory committee, Faculty Senate, the Director of Assessment, University Learning Services, the Dean of Undergraduate Studies, the Common Reading committee, the Honors College, the Department of English, various faculty and instructors (and more!) will be showcased through images, descriptions, and outcomes. Practical strategies will be provided for librarians seeking similar partnerships and who are looking to improve or expand IL in the first year experience and beyond. The IL course requirements of the general education curriculum will be presented as well as the associated partnerships that were key to their creation. Assessment of the IL experience is crucial and assessment findings from previous years will be shared. These assessments include student quizzes, questionnaires, out of class assignments, instructor surveys, and campus-wide assessments for IL at all course levels. Demographic information and details about the IL components of FYS will be included.

Asking “What’s the Matter?”: Our Experience with User Experience
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Katy Kavanagh Webb
Head, Research and Instructional Services
Joyner Library, East Carolina University
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Tamara Rhodes
Online Learning Librarian
East Carolina University
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Eleanor Cook
AD for Discovery & Technology Services
Joyner Library, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
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Christine Andresen
Instructional Design Librarin
East Carolina University/Laupus Library

For libraries, user experience (UX) is about making the user’s experience matter, by paying attention to how they interact with a particular resource or service. A research project was undertaken by a university library system to develop a sustainable UX strategy. A task force was convened to conduct a pilot with members from both libraries in the system to assess staffing responsibilities, guidelines, processes, and data gathering procedures.  The team tested a second-tier webpage common to both libraries, the Database List.  The user testing consisted of recorded interviews of seven undergraduates, seven graduate students, and eight faculty. Each participant was asked to discuss his or her familiarity with the Database List and were then given a series of tasks to see if they were successful in using the Database List to find electronic resources. The UX team analyzed the recordings, coded the responses, and wrote a report with recommendations for Database List changes as well as an analysis of the UX implementation. The changes were adopted and a second iteration of the Database List was created. The final step of the pilot was to conduct follow-up testing to compare both versions. Simultaneously, a second UX project was completed to identify personas of the libraries’ users that could be used for future UX considerations. The presenters of this session will outline the benefits and drawbacks of their project to initiate user experience in their libraries: the different staffing models, the tools and methods used for the UX study, and the findings.

Author Talk with Jim Grimsley, NC LIVE Home Grown Collection Author

Don't miss this chance to meet and hear from critically acclaimed novelist Jim Grimsley! Three of Grimsley's works are available in the NC LIVE Home Grown Ebook Collection: the novels Winter Birds and Comfort & Joy, and the brand new memoir How I Shed my Skin: Unlearning the Lessons of a Racist Childhood. Born and raised in North Carolina, Grimsley now lives in Atlanta and teaches at Emory University.

Benefits of Cross-Training in Public Libraries for Technical Services and Public Service Staff
Serenity Richards
Branch Librarian
Albert Carlton - Cashiers Community Library, Fontana Regional Library
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Jessica Philyaw
Assistant County Librarian
Jackson County Library

Cross training technical and public services staff in a public library is vital for effective patron service. Technical services staff members who attain a working knowledge of public desk service, patron needs, and use of public-facing discovery tools can better support the user experience of patrons in their libraries. Likewise, public service staff members can also benefit from cross-training in technical services. Basic knowledge of MARC records and technical services workflows can help public services staff better assist patrons with catalog searches and other item requests. This cross-training increases communication and collaboration between departments, and can also increase the collective recognition and discussion of problems and potential solutions, helping to ensure a better user experience for patrons. This session will discuss the challenges, benefits, and successes in this type of staff cross training.

Best Books for Young Minds: Choosing Books That Foster Preschool Literacy & Kindergarten Readiness
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Alan Bailey
Associate Professor & Head of Services
Teaching Resources Center, J.Y. Joyner Library, East Carolina University

Since children develop the critical language and early reading skills necessary to enter kindergarten between birth and age five, reading aloud is one of the most influential steps librarians, teachers, parents, caregivers, and others can take to cultivate preschool literacy skills. Early exposure to books heavily influences vocabulary knowledge, which in turn improves later reading skills and helps foster lifelong literacy. Based on the book Building a Core Print Collection for Preschoolers, this presentation highlights strategies for selecting books designed to meet the intellectual, developmental, language, cognitive, creative, and social needs for children from birth to age five.  Additionally, how reading aloud directly impacts kindergarten readiness, literacy, and lifelong learning will be discussed. 

Beta Phi Mu Breakfast
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Tammy Baggett
Director
Durham County Library

The Beta Phi Mu Breakfast will take place on October 22, 2015 from 7:30 am - 8:30 am. The speaker will be Ms. Tammy K. Baggett, Library Director, Durham County Library.  Ms. Baggett will provide a discussion of how you can make a difference in the library profession regardless of your position.  As employees of the library we have an opportunity and obligation to impact our communities. This presentation will target the profession in general with an emphasis on] individuals new to the profession and how more persons already in the profession can become more involved in leadership. Director Baggett will offer recommendations on how to really make our work matter!   The Beta Phi Mu Breakfast welcomes members and NCLA conference attendees to attend.

 

 

Big Libraries & Small: Readers' Advisory Service for All
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Dan Brooks
Adult Services Manager
Wake County Public Libraries
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Bonnie Dail
Head of Circulation
Wayne County Public LIbrary

Public Libraries come in many different sizes, staffing levels, and collection & budget sizes. They also serve different populations and types of readers across the state. Dan Brooks and Bonnie Dail both participated in the 2014 NCLA Leadership Institute and their L.I. projects were each related to Readers’ Advisory service. Since Dan works for Wake County, one of the largest library systems in the state, and Bonnie works for Wayne County, a smaller system, they offer different perspectives on how to serve readers through passive and active Readers’ Advisory service. Dan & Bonnie will each briefly discuss their Leadership Institute projects, speak about the similarities and differences in how each of their library systems offer Readers’ Advisory service, and then open the floor to questions and discussion from attendees about how we can all best serve readers across North Carolina.

Books That Pop!
Rebecca Vargha
Head, School of Information and Library Science Library
UNC Chapel Hill University Libraries

Pop-up or movable books are intricately crafted objects that combine art, paper engineering and storytelling in a way that engages readers of all ages. Why do these specialized books matter?  Everyone loves the surprise of the "pop" or the action on the next page.  The art, development and educational value of pop-up books will be discussed in this presentation.  The practical tips will include the real challenges and joys of collecting pop-up books in libraries plus suggestions for marketing your collection.  The Information and Library Science Library at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill has an extensive collection of pop-up books.  A display of selected pop-up books from the collection will be included with new titles like Matthew Reinhart's Transformers  The Ultimate Pop-Up Universe and Wicked The Musical: A Pop-Up Compendium to Robert Sabuda's interpretation of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.

Build It and They Will Come: The Mary Livermore Library Experience Making Recreational Collections Matter
Claire Clemens
Instructional Services/Reference Librarian
UNC Pembroke/Mary Livermore Library
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David Young
Catalog Librarian
UNC-Pembroke/Mary Livermore Library
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June Power
Access Services/Reference Librarian
The University of North Carolina at Pembroke / Mary Livermore Library

UNCP’s Library thinks outside the suggestion box to make user interests matter when it comes to recreational collections.  Community patrons are grateful for the large selection of bestsellers, graphic novels, major motion pictures and television series, but the students (and faculty) are the biggest consumers.  This panel presentation will outline the game plan that makes the magic happen. 

June Power, Access Services/Reference Librarian and big fan of the graphic novel collection, will provide insight into the popularity of new releases displayed near the library entrance. The graphic novel collection, started as a joint venture with the student anime/manga club, has boomed in recent years, both in circulation and size. New editions are available next to the heavily used and perused New York Times bestsellers. 

David Young, Catalog Librarian, will present statistical documentation and reveal in detail the design, development and execution of the unique features and processes contributing to the continued, huge popularity of the media collection.  From reference desk queries to shelving practices and circulation policies, public and technical services staff collaborate and coordinate to provide popular and curricular films quickly and efficiently.

Claire Clemens, Instructional Services/Reference Librarian, will discuss college student readership of young adult novels.  Moving outside the realm of PreK-12 curriculum materials, young adult literature is now sought after for pleasure reading. 

Can DVDs, comics and “juvenile” books entice today’s students to visit the library for the first time and keep them coming back?  This panel will be the inspiration to make popular collections matter.

Building a Stronger Village for Kids: When the Public Librarian partners with the School’s Media Specialist.
Tanika Martin
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Julianne Dunn
Librarian I Youth Services
Cumberland County Public Library & Information Center

Can we share the same space in the mind of a child? This conference session will introduce NCLA Leadership Institute projects created by Julianne Dunn and Tanika Martin focusing on building the relationships between Media Specialists and Public Librarians to better serve the community.  Why does this relationship even matter? Can the Public Librarian help the Media Specialists? Vice versa? By utilizing modes of effective communications, establishing an intimate understanding of roles and literacy goals, staying committed to the task of strengthening young readers and nurturing their need for lifelong learning, this relationship can prove to be a strong partnership for SUCCESS for all involved.

Building Pyramids: Creating Partnerships in Digital Scholarship
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Richard Cox
Digital Technology Consultant
University Libraries, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro
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Chelcie Rowell
Digital Initiatives Librarian
Z. Smith Reynolds Library, Wake Forest University

 

Both the Z. Smith Reynolds Library of Wake Forest University and the UNCG University Libraries have designed service models to provide support for scholarly digital projects on their respective campuses. Both institutions are designing this new library service to be both scalable and sustainable from the outset. Additionally, rather than only being involved on the endpoints of scholarship (providing inputs and preserving outputs), both institutions are positioning librarians to partner with faculty throughout the scholarship lifecycle.

Chelcie Juliet Rowell and Richard Cox will discuss the history of their distinct campus strategies, as well as the current state of their initiatives, including but not limited to their environment, goals, types of services offered, and outcomes. Past scholarly digital projects will serve as real-world examples, including mapping applications, research data mashups, and more. They will also touch upon both the expected challenges they face, as well as how their individual approaches to supporting scholarly research are applicable to other institutions.

URLs:

Build ZSR: http://build.zsr.wfu.edu/

UNCG Digital Initiatives Partnerships: http://library.uncg.edu/research/support/

Bus Transportation - Endowment Dinner

Transportation is included in the price of the Endowment Dinner.  Please make sure to pick up your ticket from the Registration area before preparing to board the buses.

But I don't want another tote bag: Re-evaluating summer reading
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Kate Engelbrecht
Librarian
Charlotte Mecklenburg Library

Summer reading programs can be so much more than getting a small plastic prize for fudging a reading record to reach 20 minutes a day.  Explore options to expand your summer reading program with program series, community partnerships and experience-based prizes.  Learn about our successes and challenges during a tour the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library summer reading website for all ages.

Calling All Night Owls: Making Connections Across Campus with the Long Night Against Procrastination
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Elizabeth Marcus
Undergraduate Experience Librarian
Hunter Library, Western Carolina University
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Anne Burke
Undergraduate Instruction and Outreach Librarian
North Carolina State University Libraries
Heidi Buchanan
Research & Instruction Librarian
Western Carolina University
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Hannah Pope
Instruction and Reference Intern and Graduate Assistant
NCSU Libraries and Park Library
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Julia Glauberman
Reference & Instruction Intern
NCSU Libraries

Libraries all over the world host LNAP (Long Night Against Procrastination) events in order to support and encourage students working on academic projects; the event originated in Germany and has now reached North Carolina!  By hosting a LNAP event, librarians make valuable connections with campus partners and demonstrate the library’s value to students.  In most LNAP events, librarians and writing tutors join forces to provide late-night research and writing support for students. Study breaks throughout the evening often include exercise, food, or other stress-reducing diversions such as therapy dogs and raffles. Western Carolina University and North Carolina State University held inaugural LNAP events this spring semester and will share their experiences.  Attendees will gain practical strategies for hosting their own LNAP event. Presenters will share details of their unique experiences and provide useful advice in the following areas:

Planning, programming, and promotion

Collaborating with campus and community organizations

Using social media prior to and throughout the event

Funding the event and recruiting volunteers

Evaluating the experience

Adapting the event to any library

Western Carolina’s event was held March 3, 2015, from 8pm to 2am. NC State’s event was held on April 9, 2015, from 6pm to midnight. The presenters will talk about how the timing of the event within the semester affected turnout.

Career Success with the NCLA Leadership Institute
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Emily Leachman
Senior Librarian
Central Piedmont Community College
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Jeanne Hoover
Scholarly Communication Librarian
East Carolina University
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Anne Masters
Branch Manager
Charlotte Mecklenburg Library
Virginia Bacon
Electronic Resources Acquisitions Coordinator
Duke University
Amy Whitfield
Adult Services Manager
Wake County Public Libraries

Participants from the 2014 NCLA Leadership Institute will conduct a panel discussing how the Leadership Institute contributed to their success in transitioning to new positions.  All members of the panel have transitioned to new positions during or shortly after concluding the Leadership Institute. Topics covered will include leadership skills, new supervisory roles, adjusting to new job expectations, and leading from the side.  Additionally, panel participants will discuss how they found and moved into their leadership roles.  Attendees will leave with practical advice on reaching their next career goal as well as general information about the NCLA Leadership Institute.  Panel participants will include librarians with experience in both academic and public libraries.

Changing Academic Libraries: Spaces for Learning, Collaborating, Making, and More
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Katherine Winslow
Director of the Library
NC Wesleyan College, Pearsall Library
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David Woodbury
Associate Head, User Experience
NCSU Libraries

Librarians know that libraries are no longer storehouses of information, that our libraries are both physical spaces and virtual spaces, that technology is a critical aspect of everything we do now.  With rapidly changing technologies, our resources and services are changing, and changing the ways we use space.  Academic libraries are now being designed as flexible learning spaces and makerspaces; we are rethinking how and where we provide services; we are emphasizing collaboration and building gathering places where students come to study and do research but also to see and be seen.  This program will provide a quick review of where we’ve been, show some of the new kinds of spaces that have been built, and discuss what the library of the future might be like.

CJCLS Business Meeting
CJCLS

Section business meeting.

Coffee & Tea with NMRT (New Members Round Table)

Enjoy a complimentary cup of coffee or tea and meet other conference attendees before the opening session - a great place to catch up with friends or seek out your conference mentor/mentee. This is a free and non-ticketed event, beverages are available while supplies last.

Coffee and Tea Break

Join us in the Exhibit Hall for a cup of coffee or tea - compliments of Innovative Interfaces.  Please take a moment to stop by booth 608 and say thanks!

Color with Creativity: Designing Staff Development with Limited Resources
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Michael Frye
Staff Development and Science Librarian
Winston-Salem State University
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Denelle Eads
Outreach and Staff Development Librarian
University of North Carolina at Charlotte/Atkins Library
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Kathy Bradshaw
Human Resources Librarian
University of North Carolina - Greensboro

Each year academinc libraries are being asked to do more with less. Current staff are being crossed trained in multpile tasks and professional development budgets are being slashed or disappearing althoger.  However, librarians and staff are expected to stay abreast of changing pedagogy and the everchanging trends in technology. As a result, many libraries have turned to  in house staff development and training.

Have you been given the responsibility  of planning staff develpment? Did you discover you had no budget to plan activities , and now challenged with trying to motivate an already overworked staff to participate in staff development activities? How can tighter budgets foster  more creativitiy in planning activities? And how can community agaencies and sister institutions play a role in staff development planning? During this session, participants will form the framework for a staff development activity  that will suit the needs of their library staff  and design  a strategy that will include  using  local  free agencies and/or library.

Community Outreach and Partnerships
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Michelle Mills
Associate Director of Community Relations
Alamance County Public Libraries
Dana Eure

Dana Eure, Associate Director of Lifelong Learning for the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library system, and Michelle Mills, Associate Director of Community Relations for the Alamance County Public Library system, will discuss the changing role of Outreach Services and its influence throughout communities, focusing on promoting library services, establishing partnerships and spreading your library's purpose outside of the four walls of your library.  Discussions will also include advocating for continuing education and the importance of understanding the ever-changing needs of your community.

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s Community Financial Education Project
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Ken McDonnell
Financial Education Outreach Analyst
Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau wants to help make libraries the go-to source for unbiased financial education and resources in every community. This presentation will provide detailed information on the free resources available through this project. Our goals are: 1) Build a community financial education infrastructure with libraries and national partners to reach consumers in their neighborhoods, while capitalizing on existing programs and resources already in the field. 2) Use that infrastructure to fill consumers’ critical financial knowledge gaps by providing and distributing easy-to-understand, behaviorally informed financial education content through participating public libraries. 3) Capitalize on existing programs and resources and expand efforts already occurring in communities. 4) Encourage and amplify best practices.

ConTextos: Libraries in El Salvador
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Debra Gittler
Founder and Executive Director of ConTextos
ConTextos

Literacy development as a tool to combat violence in El Salvador: In El Salvador and throughout Central America--now the most violent region in the world-- kids lack access to books and learn via rote memorization, copy and dictation. ConTextos' transforms this paradigm through innovative programming that establishes school libraries and train teachers so that kids develop authentic literacy skills. Learn about the organizations evolution to develop literacy programming that uses reading and writing as tools to not just develop academic skills, but the resilience to navigate and combat violence and trauma.

Copenhagen Chronicles: a case study of library use by study abroad students
Angela Wacker
Weekend Librarian
Elon University

United States students are studying abroad in record numbers: in 2012/2013, nearly 300,000 studied abroad for academic credit (Institute for International Education). However, little is known how these students are using academic library resources. Many academic institutions offer full use of online resources to students both on and off campus, but actual use remains undocumented. Study abroad libraries vary widely in their available resources. This summative evaluation focused on a European study abroad center library. It assessed the library’s internal key performance indicators and examined student satisfaction and resource use. Results were analyzed against the backdrop of the library’s mission, key performance indicators, and current understandings of the library needs of undergraduate students. Data collection methods included an online mid-semester survey of current students (n=645), an online survey of program alumni (n=329), usability studies (n=9), and ethnographic observation. Key findings include that student rely heavily on library equipment, that remote database access is a key component of student research but is not as reliable as has been assumed, that American students bring particular expectations about library aesthetics and layout, and that effective librarians are critical to student satisfaction.

Core Competencies? Continuing Education? Professional Development? Oh my!
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Amy Whitmer
Lead Instructor, Library and Information Technology
Central Carolina Community College
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Cathy Wright
Outreach Services Program Coordinator
Alamance County Public Libraries
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Kelly Brannock
Continuing Education Consultant
State Library of NC

The library world is constantly changing. Keeping up with the technology and resources is becoming more and more difficult to do. Luckily, in North Carolina we have a multitude of ways to keep your skills up-to-date and make yourself more marketable in the job market. In this presentation, we will be discussing the new State Library core competency standards and what they mean for library staff. We will also discuss the myriad of ways in which library staff can increase their skills through webinars or in-person workshops. We will also discuss more formal credit courses such as those offered through the online Associate Degree in Library and Information Technology and certificates at Central Carolina Community College, one of only a handful of programs like this in the United States! Finally, there will be discussion about the ALA-APA Library Support Staff Certification available to graduates of the CCCC program and what it can mean to you. This panel discussion is good for library support staff who wish to learn how to increase their skills and overall professional marketability, as well as library supervisors and managers who wish to learn how to help their staff meet competencies and professional development goals.
 

Creating Online Tutorials for Public Library Users
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Karen Feeney
Special Collections Librarian
Forsyth County Public Library
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Clay Ragan
Computer Training Bridge Program Director
Forsyth County Public Library
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Jacquelyn White
Internet Services Librarian
Forsyth County Public Library

Marketing library services in new and effective ways is a constant challenge for many libraries. Reaching users through electronic means is an inevitable aspect of marketing. Through websites, social media, blogs, video, and podcasts libraries are meeting their users at their point of need. Utilizing this approach, Forsyth County Public Library staff used open-source screencasting software to create online tutorials designed to to help users with visual learning styles and with instructional needs outside normal library hours. Discover the obstacles and opportunities of starting an online video collection in this presentation. From software selection and staff challenges to assessment, you will learn how to put into action an online tutorial collection for your library.  

Culinary Kids
Jim Zola
Children's Division Manager
High Point Public Library
Melissa Koener
Children's Librarian
High Point Public Library
Elizabeth Launt
Nutrition Outreach and Educator for Recipes for Success

A presentation on a children's program at the High Point Public Library called Culinary Kids. The program represents a partnership between the public library and UNCG's Anthropology Department. The Anthropology Department created a program called Recipe for Success to meet the nutritional needs of low-income families. Recipe for Success receives grant funding from the USDA to implement SNAP-Ed to eligible families in Guilford County. The program includes stories, games, crafts and hands-on cooking and snack creations that promote healthy food choices for children (and the parents too).

CUS Executive Board Business Meeting
Randall Bowman
Archives Librarian
Elon University

This will be a business meeting of the CUS Executive Board for both old and new members.  All members of CUS or anyone interested is welcome.

Developing an Entrepreneurial Library Culture
Mary Scanlon
Research and Instruction Librarian, Business & Economics
Wake Forest University
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Mary Krautter
Head of Research, Outreach, and Instruction
University of North Carolina at Greensboro
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Mary Beth Lock
Director of Access Services
Z. Smith Reynolds Library

Change can be challenging, but for libraries to flourish our organizations must continually adopt new ideas and create new services. Entrepreneurs are often viewed as individuals who develop ideas independently, but entrepreneurial techniques can be used to develop new ideas within organizations. Innovation can arise in an environment that allows for creative responses to entrenched problems.  Such an atmosphere can lead to an entrepreneurial culture which  rewards innovative thinking and risk-taking. Exciting new programs and projects can result from such an environment.  This session will describe entrepreneurial organizations and identify ways that you might expand entrepreneurial thinking in your library. Such a culture will encourage innovation which can lead to new programs, more efficient processes and higher morale among staff. 

Diary of a makerspace
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Sarah Prescott
Graduate Assistant
SELF Design Studio at UNCG
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Janise Jefferson
Graduate Assistant
UNCG TRC (Teaching Resources Center) SELF Design Studio
Carol Sevin
Graduate Assistant
UNCG TRC (Teaching Resources Center) SELF Design Studio

When The University of North Carolina’s School of Education decided to design an educational makerspace to instruct pre-service teachers on creating project-based lessons for K-12 students using new technologies, there were few such spaces from which to learn.  There were lots of questions...  How should we set up?  What equipment will be necessary, beneficial, or just fluff?  What makes an educational makerspace distinct from a community or academic makerspace?   How can we best share our and our students’ successes?

The SELF (Student Education Learning Factory) Design Studio, opened in October 2014.  This session discusses what we learned in the past year regarding furnishing, organizing, and equipping the makerspace.  Learn how to set up a successful educational makerspace!  (In this session we will not discuss construction or budgets.)

Digital Lifestyles: Connecting in a Changing Online Environment
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Angel Truesdale
Adult Services Specialist
Charlotte Mecklenburg Library
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Kate Engelbrecht
Librarian
Charlotte Mecklenburg Library

Are you looking for new ways to assist and connect with library users?  There are tons of tools and digital services that can broaden your online presence.  As more and more people develop digital lifestyles, spending significant time online, librarians can capitalize on this opportunity to connect with and provide services to tech-savvy users and new adults.  Users are now living in the cloud with many options to store files, communicate through video, consult health services and engage in online learning to enhance their everyday lives.   There are many options available for library staff to increase their understanding and comfort level.   Digital natives and digital immigrants alike can improve their tech-savvy customer service skills and their ability to explain digital services and technology to all types of patrons.

Diversity from the Inside Out: 8 Years of the UNCG Libraries Diversity Committee
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Stacey Krim
Cello Music Collection Archivist
Jackson Library, UNCG
Orolando Duffus
Diversity Resident Librarian
University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Tiffany Henry
Metadata & Digital Initiatives Librarian
Campbell University
Jada Jones
LIS Student
UNC-Greensboro

Founded in 2007, the Diversity Committee of UNCG Libraries develops and supports activity relating to diversity and inclusion. Recognizing that the most successful change begins from within, the Committee’s strategy for promoting diversity began with internal library staff development, expanding over time to international representation of library faculty. Examples of diversity-related programs undertaken by the committee range from staff development focused on providing support to unique populations on campus, to the creation of the Diversity Residence Librarian position. In this panel presentation, members of the UNCG Libraries Diversity Committee will discuss the programs developed and sponsored by the UNCG Libraries Diversity Committee, beginning with training from within the Libraries for staff, expanding to regional, national, and international representation.          

Do you Have My Textbook? The Debate for Textbook Access in College Libraries Rages On?
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Richard Moniz
Director of Library Services
Johnson & Wales University
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Justin Herman
Reference Librarian
Johnson & Wales University

Students continue to be challenged by the high price of higher education. Some sources place the cost of textbooks at as much as $1,200 per year (Taylor, 2012; Herther, 2014). This can be a serious hardship for students just getting by on tuition payments. The problem is further complicated since access to textbooks involves a wide variety of stakeholders: students, faculty, libraries, bookstores, instructional technologists, etc. (Lyons & Hendrix, 2014). Libraries have entered the fray but a debate rages on as to how best to assist students. The presenters will share the debate which occurred on their campus, how the library’s textbook policy has evolved, and the policy’s impact on library use and statistics. The textbook debate will be further contextualized by its connection to the following issues:

  • Retention concerns and the rising cost of college tuition
  • Comparative statistics and data showing what college libraries are doing or not doing to address this issue
  • Alternatives being developed and explored at various institutions for students such as open access textbooks and other experimental means

Visitors to this poster presentation will gain knowledge about textbook-related policies as they exist in a particular context. They will also learn what national trends are and what creative methods are being employed. They will be able to take this information with them to help reconsider their library’s policy or policies regarding textbooks and gain awareness of possible future options or trends.

*Bibliography attached

Does Forcing Students to Ask for Help Work? Assessing the Effect of REQUIRING Term Paper Consults
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Stephanie Willen Brown
director, Park Library
the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Students in the Media Management and Policy class at UNC Chapel Hill’s School of Media & Journalism are required to meet individually with a librarian as they do research for their 12-15 page paper. In fall 2014, we surveyed students to assess their response to this requirement. We wanted to know if an individual meeting helped to ease their library anxiety; if the requirement was a negative influence on their view of the library; and if they planned to visit with a librarian for future papers.

Analysis of the data shows that requiring students to ask for help works, while simply encouraging them to do so is not nearly as effective: we met with approximately 40 students per class after this requirement was implemented, compared with 10 in prior semesters. Survey results demonstrate that this arrangement increases students' willingness to ask for help from a librarian in the future and improves their view of the value of the library. Finally, our review of the appointments and the comments pointed to changes that could enhance the appointments and even the assignment itself.

This poster will illustrate responses from students to our survey as well as feedback from the professor and changes we have implemented over the semesters.

The bottom line: requiring students to ask for help works.

Draw Me a Library! Getting Input on Library Space and Services
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Sara DeWaay
Arts & Architecture Librarian
University of North Carolina, Charlotte

This poster will discuss the methods used to get student input for a library space re-design focused on space flexibility. Over the past semester I have been working on ways to get feedback from students about the library space in our architecture branch library. This project will continue into the summer and the fall 2015 term. Our goal is to improve library services, and hopefully do a space redesign that involves the needs and opinions of students as the central motivating force behind the decisions made. The poster will also address the results of the different methods used, and proposed solutions for the space.

Drive It Home: Increasing Interactivity in Instruction with Google Drive
Amy Harris Houk
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Jenny Dale
Coordinator of First-Year Programs
UNC Greensboro University Libraries

How often do you use Google Drive to collaborate with colleagues? We find ourselves using Drive and its suite of productivity tools on a daily basis to work on projects, keep statistics, and create on-the-fly surveys. Recently, we’ve been experimenting with ways to share our love of Drive with the students in our instruction sessions. UNCG is a Google Apps for Education campus, which means our students can access Drive and all of its tools from their email. However, anyone can use many of Google’s tools, such as Google Forms and Docs, as long as they are created by someone with a Google account. Several teaching librarians at UNCG have used Google Docs as a replacement for print worksheets and to encourage collaboration and Google Forms to capture assessment data. In this presentation, we will share our experiences, provide examples of Google Docs and Google Forms that we have used with our students, and ask participants to share their own experiences and brainstorm new ways to use these tools in the library classroom. In keeping with our theme, we will share a number of our own Docs with participants and will also create and share a new Doc to capture the ideas that come out of the session. Participants can expect to leave with ideas for using Google Drive in their instruction in a number of ways, from encouraging student collaboration in class to collecting student learning assessment data.

Early Literacy Outreach - Taking "Every Child Ready to Read" to Childcare Providers
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Siobhan Loendorf
Assistant Library Director
Catawba County Library
Kayla Lavigne
Early Literacy Outreach Specialist
Catawba County Library
April Green
Youth Services Librarian
Catawba County Library

This workshop takes participants from starting their own Early Literacy Outreach program to a full Every Child Ready to Read training session with outreach specialist Kayla Lavigne. The first hour focuses on the Early Literacy Outreach program made possible by an LSTA grant. Siobhan Loendorf, the grant administrator, will talk about the experience from writing the grant to evaluation of the program. Topics to be covered are grant writing, finding partnerships, performance measurement and lessons learned. The remainder of the workshop will be dedicated to teaching about the Every Child Ready to Read program; exploring its history, purpose and impact to early literacy. This is an interactive, fun presentation geared at teaching the five principles of the Every Child Ready to Read program. During the final hour of the program participants will break out into groups to explore a variety of materials that can be used as tools for early literacy. At the end of the breakout session all ideas will be captured so they may be shared via email with participants and posted to the conference website.

Effective Part-Time Librarianship: Making the Most of the Opportunities and Realities at Community Colleges
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Jennifer Stith
Reference & Instruction Librarian
Rowan-Cabarrus Community College
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Andrea Kincaid
Reference & Instruction Librarian
Rowan-Cabarrus Community College

Part-time librarianship presents a unique set of benefits and challenges to professional librarians in the community college setting.  This session will explore these “opportunities” and “realities” by presenting the results of a survey of part-time community college librarians in North Carolina.

Often part-time librarian positions are the perfect opportunity for newly graduated students to enter the workforce.  Other opportunities for part-time librarianship include acquiring career experience and on-the-job skills, a flexible work schedule and the freedom to work at another type of library.  However, part-time librarians must also deal with the “realities,” including not only the lack of benefits, vacation or sick time, but other possibly unforeseen realities such as an inability to fully participate in professional development activities and/or to engage on campus and the community.

Though the focus of our session is how these issues affect librarians, we will also briefly discuss the opportunities and realities that affect the community college as a whole.  As the community college environment continues to morph, LRCs must continually exhibit their intrinsic value on campus.  This is hard to accomplish without a strong and sustained librarian presence.  Students also suffer the consequences of the lack of a full-time professional librarian that is consistently available to work with them.  By the end of the session, we hope to have demonstrated how part-time librarianship is affecting North Carolina community colleges and to lay out the groundwork for needed improvements.

Engaging with Faculty over Research
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Nina Exner
Librarian
North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

While traditionally, academic library liaisons have partnered with faculty through teaching and collection development, at NC A&T we’ve been partnering through research too. Faculty lives center around the three academic pillars of teaching, research, and service. This session will concentrate on research roles in the Academy, and how librarians can build partnerships with faculty through research. It will be especially useful for librarians working with science and social science faculty in university environments. Research cuts across the Academy, and is a great way to approach and build interest among your faculty. Almost every library function has critical roles to play in the new research landscape! Traditional bibliographic, descriptive, preservation, searching, and reference roles are all involved, as well as newer issues in licensing and scholarly communications. This session will reprise some of our “Research Literacy” approach introduced at the previous Biennial conference, then go on to practical issues in faculty research engagement. Attendees will discuss potential campus partnerships and learn about free tools for helping faculty with research funding and governmental research compliance. Discuss how federal rules are requiring more assistance with data archiving and open publishing, and how librarians can partner with researchers to improve campus research initiatives. Attendees will come away with practical conversation-starters for approaching faculty about research, and a list of potential partners for building library/research relationships.

Enhancing Students’ Online Research, Reading, and Writing Practices with ProQuest Flow
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Kathy Shields
Head of Reference and Instructional Services
High Point University
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Allison Walker
Instructor, Department of English
High Point University

Librarians, disciplinary faculty, and teachers alike lament students’ poor digital reading skills. We want students to engage with text online, but how? How do we make it easy for students to save and share what they find with us and their peers? And, most importantly, how do we get them to engage with those sources in a meaningful way? This session will focus on one potential solution - ProQuest Flow. Flow is a web-based citation manager (available in free and fee-based versions) that allows students to capture information directly from websites, catalogs, and databases, create citations, highlight and annotate the content they find, and share collections, all within one program. Shared collections also allow for multiple editors, and changes automatically update, so students get immediate access and interactive source-based conversations with peers and instructors. Flow doesn’t require downloading any software; you just add a button on your browser toolbar. In this session, a librarian and an English instructor will discuss how they have used Flow with first year writing students over the past few semesters. Participants will leave with working knowledge of Flow, how to introduce it to students, librarians, and faculty, successful strategies for using it with students in the library and the classroom, and lessons learned. If participants want to get hands-on practice during the session, we recommend they create a ProQuest Flow account (free with a .edu email) prior to the session and bring a laptop with them, as Flow is not currently supported on mobile devices.

Fandom, Fanfiction, and Readers' Advisory
Rebecca Honeycutt
NextReads Bibliographer
NoveList
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Kim Burton
NoveList Editor/Bibliographer - Adult RA Specialist
NoveList
Elizabeth Coleman
Adult Materials Cataloger
NoveList
Autumn Winters
Editor/Bibliographer
NoveList
Jennifer Brannen

Discover the basics of fandom and fanfiction, and learn how these cultural phenomena can drive better readers' advisory in your library.

1.  Fandom:  a) Definition and brief overview of fandom, in history and in current society, in real live, and as a conventional use. b) How understanding fandom can help you understand your patrons and their reading/viewing/programming interests.  c) Fandom trivia activity

2. Fanfiction: a) Definition and brief overview of fanction (copyright concerns, terms, cultural context)  b) Definition and overview of the romantic/erotic subgenre of slash and the concept of shipping c) How understanding fanfic can help you understand your patrons and their reading/viewing/programming interests

3.  Fandom and fanfiction in the library:  a) Rising visibility of fandom in the library for all ages  b) How fanfic/fandom impacts traditional publishing c) How fanfic/fandom impacts what and how reads read

4.  How to meet your fannish patrons' RA needs:  a) Expanding the RA interview  b) Making the most of staff knowledge  c) Finding and creating sources fro searching, browsing, and keeping up

5.  Discussion (Q & A)

 

Flipping LIB210: The Flipped Classroom Model in Action
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Hubert Womack
Instruction and Outreach Librarian
Z. Smith Reynolds Library - Wake Forest University

Lib210 is a half-semester, 1.5 hour class for majors and minors in the Social Sciences at Wake Forest University. This class focuses on giving students the research tools they need to conduct research in the Social Sciences and making sure they are comfortable with those tools and can use them to effectively and efficiently find social science research. Each of the thirteen class meetings in Lib210 was redesigned to follow the flipped classroom model, with course content delivered outside of class, and active learning activities and authentic assessment through project based learning during class. Students used a course pack of Kindle Fire HDs to access much of the online content to be developed for this course. The course also used tools like Browzine to encourage students to keep abreast of the scholarly research of their discipline and LinkedIN to create a professional profile as they begin engaging in the scholarly community around their discipline. Students also learned to use Zotero to organize research and cite sources after mastering the APA citation style.

This presentation focuses on the process of converting Lib210 course into a flipped classroom course, and the student response to the flipped classroom model, where students have more time to focus on developing research skills in the classroom in a group setting with active learning exercises and immediate feedback from the instructor.

Forming Partnership: Health Sciences Library Collaborates with Community Colleges to Create Interactive Training Tools
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Rachel Hinrichs
Research Assistant
Health Sciences Library at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill
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Brenda Linares
Outreach Librarian and Coordinator of User Services Graduate Assistants
UNC-Chapel Hill Health Sciences Library

In accordance with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library’s mission statement to promote public service beyond UNC’s campus, we sought to build collaborative relationships between the Health Sciences Library, and local community colleges.  We received an outreach express award from the National Library of Medicine to reach out to librarians, students, faculty, and staff at community colleges because of the important role they play in the training and development of the allied health professions. This project was developed in response to the health information needs identified in survey results from faculty and students at Durham Technical Community College, and Central Carolina Community College. Based on results indicating that 86% of students reported that they learn better with hands-on activities and tutorials, we developed two interactive training modules for developing research skills. The next step will be testing the modules with the users.  The lessons learned from this project will be helpful for libraries that want to partner with and reach out to community colleges.

From Bears to Bookmobiles: Uncovering North Carolina History through Film and Audio Digitization
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Lisa Gregory
Digital Projects Librarian
North Carolina Digital Heritage Center
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Molly Bragg
Digital Collections Program Manager
Duke University Libraries

In 2014, the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center, in partnership with the Digital Public Library of America, decided to expand its services to include audio-visual materials. We asked our more than 170 partners to recommend films and tapes from their collections for an AV Digitization Pilot Project.  From this call came a wide variety of media and subjects, showing North Carolina places from Grandfather Mountain to the Outer Banks. Oral histories, parades, plays, advertisements, and documentaries: the project yielded over 150 files from 11 partners. 

Duke University Library’s Digital Production Center has been working with Audio-Visual formats since 2009.  Since then they have digitized collections that include a wide variety of formats and content from oral histories on cassettes, to interviews of influential figures on BetaSP.  In 2015, Duke published 92 video recordings made by H. Lee Waters, which offer glimpses into the lives of North Carolinians (and surrounding states) during the depression.  

This panel presentation will describe these two projects, including lessons learned, and also feature clips showcasing the films digitized in each of these projects.

From Vineyard to Winery: Using NC LIVE Resources to Support Small Business Development
Mary Scanlon
Research and Instruction Librarian, Business & Economics
Wake Forest University
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Betty Garrison
Business Research Librarian
Carol Grotnes Belk Library, Elon University
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Sara Thynne
Reference and Instruction Librarian
Alamance Community College
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Heather Greer Klein
Member Services Coordinator
NC LIVE

: In the process of developing a new business or new product area, businesses benefit from researching the marketplace. In this session, librarians will learn how to use NC LIVE databases to support small businesses in the research process.  Using a case study format, we’ll walk the audience through the process of researching the industry and market for a new product, discovering current industry conditions, growth rate and profitability along with characteristics of likely customers, where they shop and how they choose a brand in this product category.

Fun Matters
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Marian Fragola
Director, Program Planning & Outreach
NCSU Libraries
Chris Tonelli
Director of Communication Strategy
NCSU Libraries
Aaron Welborn
Director of Communications
Duke University Libraries

To dispel their historically stodgy reputations, academic libraries are taking a cue from other industries and infusing their marketing and public programming with interactive, whimsical, witty, and even edgy strategies. In this session, staff from Duke and NCSU Libraries will explore examples from our own external relations initiatives. From experimenting with low-cost social media campaigns to hosting events centered around intriguing alumni, academic libraries are using "fun" to develop memorable and lasting relationships with their various constituencies. We will also share the lessons learned from events and marketing efforts that have missed the mark and how low-stakes failures can actually improve your game. 

Geek the Teach: Enhancing Basic Trainer Skills to Create Dynamic Facilitators/APPLYING BASIC TRAINING PRINCIPLES
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Kelly Brannock
Continuing Education Consultant
State Library of NC
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Tiffany Hayes
Library Training Coordinator
Cumberland County Public Library & Information Center
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Jason Rogers
Library Manager
Wake County Public Library
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Suvanida Duangudom
Campus Librarian
Wake Technical Community College, Northern Wake Campus
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Luba Sawczyn
Manager, Graham Public Library
Alamance County Public Libraries

THIS WORKSHOP IS NOW FULL.

This experiential half-day preconference session is a refresher for experienced trainers and an opportunity for beginning trainers to apply the fundamentals of adult learning.

Building the Barn one Wall at a Time: Applying Basic Training Principles
In this half-day session, participants will work collaboratively in groups to develop a sample training session that incorporates and applies basic training design principles, accommodates different learning styles, focuses on appropriate goals and learning objectives, maximizes audience engagement, and includes strategies for evaluation.  This workshop is led by a team of experienced North Carolina Master Trainers who will facilitate an afternoon of active, participatory learning, including breakout groups with hands-on practice to create, develop, and finalize effective training sessions.

Come ready to learn, collaborate, and practice effective and engaging training techniques with a supportive community of novice and veteran trainers!

There is no registration fee to attend this preconference session; this program requires a minimum of 10 registrations by October 12th. 

Geek the Teach: Enhancing Basic Trainer Skills to Create Dynamic Facilitators/FUNDAMENTALS OF TRAINING
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Kelly Brannock
Continuing Education Consultant
State Library of NC
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Tiffany Hayes
Library Training Coordinator
Cumberland County Public Library & Information Center
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Jason Rogers
Library Manager
Wake County Public Library
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Suvanida Duangudom
Campus Librarian
Wake Technical Community College, Northern Wake Campus
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Luba Sawczyn
Manager, Graham Public Library
Alamance County Public Libraries

THIS WORKSHOP IS NOW FULL.

This introductory session is designed for prospective, first-time, or beginning trainers to ensure that they are knowledgeable and qualified to design and lead effective training sessions for adult learners. 

Laying a Foundation: Fundamentals of Training
This half-day session is led by a team of experienced North Carolina Master Trainers who will introduce the fundamentals of presenting effective, engaging training for adult learners.  This session will cover basic instructional design principles, strategies to create effective learning goals and objectives, and techniques to help you better engage your audience. 

By the end of the session, attendees will:

  • understand core principles and techniques for training adult learners
  • use basic principles and techniques to start designing appropriate learning objectives
  • be familiar with strategies to create an engaging learning experience
  • feel more confident about designing and leading training sessions for adult learners

Come prepared (and dress casually) for a morning of active learning and fun!

There is no registration fee to attend this preconference session; this program requires a minimum of 10 registrations by October 12th. 

 

Genealogy Triage
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Karen Feeney
Special Collections Librarian
Forsyth County Public Library
Lisa Kobrin
Reference Librarian
Alamance County Public Libraries (May Memorial Library)
Arthur Erickson

With television shows such as "Who Do You Think You Are?" driving interest, genealogy is becoming one of the most popular hobbies in the United States.  Join us for a crash course in genealogy that will help you answer your patrons burning questions like, "Why can't I find a birth certificate from1800?" and "What happened to the 1890 census?"

 

Getting Your First LIS Job: Tips, Tricks, and Reflections from Recent LIS Grads
Sarah Crissinger
Information Literacy Librarian
Davidson College
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Madison Sullivan
NCSU Libraries Fellow
North Carolina State University

The State Library of North Carolina has identified five active MLS/ MLIS schools in the state of North Carolina (State Library). While many LIS students at these LIS schools receive some form of job placement support from their institution, hearing from other LIS students about their recent experiences on the job market can often be helpful. Further evidence of this can be seen through colleague-to-colleague support networks for those navigating the LIS job market, including websites such as I Need a Library Job (INALJ.com), and Hiring Librarians (hiringlibrarians.com).
 
This session, facilitated by two recent LIS graduates who found employment in 2015, will provide resources on cover letter and resume creation, phone and Skype interview techniques, and on-campus timelines and expectations. The session will also offer tips on what current LIS students can do now to effectively prepare for their eventual job search.
 
Finally, the session will include a discussion period where participants will be able to share their experiences and expertise as well as an interactive activity where participants will be able to explore the process a search committee goes through. It is our goal that, together, we can share knowledge and make job search advice more accessible and transparent for all North Carolina LIS students. The focus of this session is the academic library job search for current students and new professionals; however, all are welcome.   
 
References
 
State Library of North Carolina. (n.d.). Library Schools in NC. Retrieved from http://statelibrary.ncdcr.gov/ld/education/libraryschools.html
 
 

Getting your ideas published in North Carolina Libraries
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Ralph Scott
Professor
East Carolina University

Publishing your research can be a daunting task. Members of the Editorial Board of North Carolina Libraries discuss the process for submitting articles to the journal. We will cover the review process and what sort of time line you can expect for your article. An actual demonstration article will be submitted and you will be shown how the review process occurs.

 

Go Ask the Jennifers: Everything you wanted to know about the romance genre but were afraid to ask
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Jennifer Lohmann
Adult Services Manager
Durham County Library, Southwest Regional
Jennifer Brannen

A popular overview of the romance genre; the Jennifers will cover the many different subgenres of romance, trends, the online community, and some of the many reasons why romances are so popular.  If you've ever felt intimidated when someone asks for reading recommendations for Julia Quinn or wondered what all the different Harlequins lines were about, this is the presentation for you.  The Jennifers will hand out a list of recommended authors and there will be books for you to take home.

Google Community Online Book Clubs
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Kerri Brown Parker
Librarian
NC State University, College of Education

Google Communities provide members a platform to host synchronous and asynchronous discussions, post new ideas, share content and more. In this session, you will participate in a Google Community Book Club modeling how you can use Google Communities for book discussions with different groups. Google Communities can also be used for your own professional development and we will explore different active Communities. Create your own Community by the end of the session and plan how you might use it for a teen book club, a book club with other librarians or a book club/discussion group in your school/university. Session participants will be provided with a "demo" Google Community Book Club to participate in as well as instructions for setting up a Google Community with an embedded Google Hangout. To fully participate, attendees should have a mobile device or laptop and a Google account.

Google Up Your Library!
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Kerri Brown Parker
Librarian
NC State University, College of Education

Google tools, add-ons in Drive, the omnibox and more can be used to help students research more effectively, to collect data about your library, to assess student/patron learning, and more. Use the power of Google to achieve information literacy goals, manage student/teen clubs, provide resource lists/pathfinders, create professional development sessions, collect book recommendations and techify your librarianship. The poster will be broken down with tools supporting the following sections: management, research guidance/tools, tutorials, resource lists/pathfinders, instruction and professional development, and literature/reading/literacy. A website will be provided for additional information and links to all tools presented in the poster session. To try out the tools and extensions shared in the poster, be sure you have a Google account and have explored the basics of Google in general and specifically Google Chrome. 

Government Resources Section Business Meeting
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Michele Hayslett
Librarian for Numeric Data Svcs and Data Management
UNC at Chapel Hill, Davis Library

The Government Resources Section invites your input into the direction of our group over the next two years.  We will install the newly elected officers; conclude the voting to approve the bylaws changes; and review the results of the programming survey we sent out in the spring and discuss future programs.  Please join us and reconnect with your government resources colleagues!

Grant Writing 101
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Kelley O'Brien
Director for Strategy and Innovation
UNC-CH School of Government

Many local governments and nonprofits are looking for grant funding to support new initiatives or to fill budgetary gaps for existing programs. Designed for public and nonprofit sector professionals new to grant writing, the session will provide participants with tools to evaluate grant opportunities, develop cohesive grant proposals, and make informed decisions about accepting grant funding. 

Grant Writing 101 Objectives

  • Learn about the sources of grant funding
  • Understand types of grant funding
  • Explore federal grant funding in detail
  • Become familiar with the primary components of grant proposals
  • Understand grant writing as a tool for program planning

Grant Writing 101 General Outline

  • Overview of successful grant writing
  • Overview of grants—types of awards and support, budget terminology
  • Review a request for proposals (RFP)
  • Logic models as a tool for program planning
    • Developing a logic model
    • Creating a budget
Grassroots Library Advocacy: What’s YOUR Message?
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Amy Gustavson
Reference, Instruction, & Emerging Technologies Librarian
Central Carolina Community College

Advocacy is more than public relations or marketing!  Library advocacy is an ongoing process that helps your community connect their goals to library services.  It involves professionalism across the organization from the director all the way to your student assistants.  Attendees of this hands-on session will develop dynamic elevator speeches based on Dan & Chip Heath’s success model from Made to Stick and the ALA Library Advocate’s Handbook.  As a result of Central Carolina Community College’s 2014-2015 Grassroots Library Advocacy Campaign, library usage greatly increased and 13 substantial partnerships were developed on-campus.  At the heart of the campaign were engaging, thoughtful elevator speeches that connected library services with the user’s needs.  This session is for all library staff regardless of institution type.

Growing Leaders in North Carolina Libraries
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Joetta Pittman
Information Services Manager
Braswell Memorial Library
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Tiffany Hayes
Library Training Coordinator
Cumberland County Public Library & Information Center
Debbie Shreve
Branch Manager
Wake County Public Libraries
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Michael Crumpton
Asst Dean for Administrative Services
University of North Carolina at Greensboro
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Cathy Wright
Outreach Services Program Coordinator
Alamance County Public Libraries
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Catie Roche
Director
Braswell Memorial Library

NCLA's Leadership Institute is a great boon to North Carolina Libraries.  Past mentors, attendees, and committee members will share anecdotes, passion for their craft, and information on the Institute itself. 

Every other year library staff from across the state apply for a spot in the Leadership Institute.  Join our discussion and find out why the Institute is so important, how you can use it to improve your job satisfaction, sharpen your leadership skills (no matter what position you hold), and what opportunities LI has provided previous attendees. Involvement in LI lasts far beyond the weekend retreat; the network of NC Library Leaders you create is invaluable. The opportunity to hear from people from different library types, in different stages of their careers, and levels of current responsibility provides valuable insight into how libraries and library staff across the state are working through challenges just like yours.

Leadership can come from every level and every person, what's your leadership potential?

Guys Read @ Wayne County Public Library
Heath Radford
Reference Librarian
Wayne County Public Library

Guys Read @ Wayne County Public Library In 2014 Wayne County Public Library established a Guys Read Library Club for boys grades 3-5 which is modeled after Guysread.com, a web- based literacy program founded by author Jon Scieszka. The program’s mission is to have boys become self-motivated, life-long readers. This is achieved by providing a setting that is one of acceptance and camaraderie where boys are free to relax and be themselves. Themed programs are selected around the interests of the boys, and involve many opportunities for active engagement. In this session participants will have an opportunity to learn more about Guys Read and its mission, and how Wayne County Public Library adapted the program to the public library environment. The presenter will walk participants through the steps that were taken in moving this program from idea to inception, and will conclude the session by detailing some potential evidence based program outcomes.

Helping Immigrants through USCIS Resources
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Carly Dlugoszewski
Community Relations Officer
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services

Learn about the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services and how you can assist immigrants to your library's community. North Carolina has one of the fastest growing populations of immigrants in the United States. Often these are people who need many types of help and come to the library for assistance. Your library can help them learn what opportunities they have toward becoming United States Citizens. Carly Dlugoszewski with the Charlotte Field Office of USCIS will talk about materials available, program opportunites, and websites to assist you in these efforts. Your library could host a Naturalization Ceremony…very cool!

How Did You Do That? Putting Together a How-To Festival @ Your Library
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Denice Enstine
Information Services Librarian
Cumberland County Public Library & Information Center
Emma Pinault
Information Services Librarian
Cumberland County Public Library & Information Center
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Tiffany Torres
Library Awareness Coordinator
Cumberland County Public Library & Information Center

Learn how Cumberland County Public Library staff organized a free, fun, family-friendly event where attendees learned about everything from repairing drywall to brewing the perfect cup of tea in 30- to 45-minute sessions. Find out how to come up with session topics, where to look for presenters, how to build your schedule, what kinds of supplies you'll need, how to improvise when things don't go exactly how you'd planned and how to evaluate the experience once it's all over. Presenters will give you tips on putting together a day that your community will really appreciate, and share the lessons they've learned about organizing a large system-wide event.

How Do You Serve? A Crucial Conversation on Making Diversity Matter
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Dr. Robert L. Canida, II
Director for Diversity and Inclusion
UNC-Pembroke


In this interactive presentation, participants will be engaged and challenged on how they serve and interact with library clients from diverse backgrounds. Participants should come with an open mind, a listening ear, and a willingness to change.
 

 

 

If You Build It, Will They Come? Designing a More Engaged Liaison Program
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Teresa LePors
Coordinator of Library Research and Scholarly Services
Carol Grotnes Belk Library, Elon University
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Betty Garrison
Business Research Librarian
Carol Grotnes Belk Library, Elon University

In order to strengthen faculty interactions with its liaison librarians, Elon University’s Belk Library created a department of Library Research and Scholarly Services during a recent reorganization.  Department members reviewed current literature in the field to identify best practices and successful strategies in liaison activities and will share their findings.  Additionally, one liaison librarian’s faculty interactions over a 5-month period were analyzed using concept mapping to identify patterns of interactions.  These results will inform your understanding of time/effort involved in liaison activities, identify activities that were particularly successful, and reveal opportunities to close gaps in our faculty interactions.  Our results will encourage you to take your liaison responsibilities to a higher level of faculty engagement.

Impactful Partnerships: Collaborating with Faculty for Effective Teaching and Learning
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Mimi Smith-DeCoster
Instructional Technology Librarian
Guilford College
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Heather Hans
Instructional Design & Assessment Librarian
Guilford College

As librarians explore the balance between acting as “support” and acting as “authority,” we hope to find common ground for partnership and collaboration. Recent work in the area of faculty outreach has focused on creating a liaison model around collections & instruction. Our outreach includes those elements, but centers around our expertise in and collaboration on instructional design and technology. We approach faculty as peers and fellow instructors, and we collaborate on high-level projects related to course design, instructional tools, classroom technology, digital media creation, and information literacy. We will share our experiences as facilitators of the teaching and learning process and suggest ways to build a culture of librarians and faculty as collaborative partners.

Participants will:

  • Evaluate perceptions of the library at their institution
  • Identify effective modes of communication for faculty outreach
  • Develop ideas for outreach approaches tailored to faculty needs and perceptions


This session will both discuss and model collaborative problem-solving to create effective faculty outreach plans.

 

Increasing, or Just Keeping, Your Budget
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Kathy Makens
Resources and Finance Officer
Durham County Library

It is very difficult to translate the work that we do in public libraries and the value we provide to those who control the budgets we receive.  Even if you aren’t the greatest at math, learn how to show the return on investment that you provide, how your budget looks over time when adjusted for inflation, and ask for reasonable salaries.

Participants will learn how to use NC Live business resources, tools from several federal websites, and best practices from other libraries to help bolster the case for adequate funding.  Templates and handouts will be provided.

Introducing the Digital Public Library of America
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Nicholas Graham
Program Coordinator
North Carolina Digital Heritage Center

The Digital Public Library of America is an ambitious new effort to provide a single place for users to discover. Since its launch a couple of years ago, the DPLA has grown to include more than 10 million records from libraries, archives, and museums around the country, including many in North Carolina. This presentation will give an introduction to what’s in the DPLA, how North Carolina contributes, and what the DPLA can mean to your users.

Introduction to BIBFRAME and Linked Data
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Elizabeth Cramer
Coordinator, Bibliographic Services
Appalachian State University
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Andrea Leonard
E-Access & Metadata Librarian
Appalachian State University

Have you been hearing a lot about linked data, BIBFRAME, and the death of MARC? How bibliographic exchange is busting from the catalog onto the web?

Have you been hearing a lot about linked data, BIBFRAME, and the death of MARC? How bibliographic exchange is busting from the library catalog onto the web?

This presentation will provide a conceptual overview of linked data and BIBFRAME, plus a summary of resources and best practices to help you understand and prepare for the future of bibliographic data exchange. Audience takeaways will include an update on current initiatives, a list of tools used, and sources for further information. A question and answer session will promote the exchange of questions and ideas from the audience as we explore the upcoming changes in bibliographic and metadata exchange.


 

Is it time for a paradigm shift? Increasing the Intersection of Academic Libraries and Undergraduate Students through a Holistic Approach
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Rebecca Croxton
Doctoral Student / LIS Instructor
University of North Carolina at Greensboro

To explore reasons that underlie the current underutilization of academic libraries by undergraduate students and consider ways by which to increase the relevance of libraries for this population, a mixed methods study is being undertaken as part of a doctoral dissertation research project at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.  Principles of social integration, technology acceptance, usability, and motivation are being used to guide the research.  

With the ubiquity of information available on the Internet, the digital resources of academic libraries are underutilized, as undergraduate students are largely satisfying their academic research and everyday life information needs via Google with resources that are often less credible and reliable than those that are available through their libraries. Further, findings in the literature suggest students are finding digital library resources such as those available through online databases and library catalogs to be difficult and frustrating to use and are, therefore, turning to resources that are more convenient, quicker, and easier to use. 

This presentation will share preliminary findings of this study and propose a new model that places the academic library as the information center of the university.  This new model is being designed to increase the intersection of academic libraries and their undergraduates by holistically addressing both the academic and everyday life information needs of students in a user-centered, customizable manner.    

Is Your Academic Library SACSCOC Compliant?
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Catherine Lee
Dean, Learning Resource Center
Cape Fear Community College

If your institution will be coming up for review by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) within the next 1 to 3 years, take this opportunity to get a refresher on the Library-specific Core Requirement and Comprehensive Standards. Learn what reviewers will look for during the off-site review of the Compliance Certification and see examples of documentation to include in support of compliance. 

It Matters! Advertising the Library
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Robert Arndt
Reference/Instructional Services Librarian
University of North Carolina at Pembroke/Mary Livermore Library
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June Power
Access Services/Reference Librarian
The University of North Carolina at Pembroke / Mary Livermore Library

Most libraries advertise their services in numerous ways. With the public being bombarded with the visual messages, how do you make your events stand out and attract attention? How do you make your event and services matter in the visual jungle?  At the University of North Carolina at Pembroke, the Mary Livermore Library advertises their services and events in a variety of low-cost ways including use of an in-house message board, social media sites such as Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter, Tumblr, and other traditional ways. The session will cover the type of events and services to advertise, selection of formats for presention, methods to attract the visual attention of both the library goer and the casual viewer, and the software and equipment needed to produce the final product.

Keep Calm and Enjoy the Library: Eliminating Library Anxiety Through Dynamic User Engagement
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Amanda Glenn-Bradley
User Engagement Librarian
D. Hiden Ramsey Library at UNC Asheville

Constance Mellon first coined the term library anxiety in her 1986 article entitled "Library Anxiety: A Grounded Theory and Its Development ", published in College and Research Libraries, to describe the typical reaction experienced by a college student upon embarking on library research, or even setting foot in a college library. We, as library and information professionals, still encounter this level of fear each day with our users regardless of the type of library we work in or the complexity of their query.  Libraries can be intimidating spaces. At the University of North Carolina at Asheville’s D. Hiden Ramsey Library, we developed and implemented two activities aimed at two facets of our community, incoming freshmen and regional middle school students, to present our library in a wholly positive, unintimidating light. Our emBARK Scavenger Hunt, run in conjunction with freshman orientation, along with the Flash Fiction Project, run in conjunction with Explore the Tour, engage our students with active learning, creativity, and teamwork rather than a simple tour of our space. The results; a marked improvement in the perception of our library and a reduction in feelings of anxiety in using our space! This presentation will highlight the research and methodology behind each of the aforementioned activities, provide an overview of the hardware and software involved in each, and foster a sense of teamwork as conference goers participate in one of the activities! 

Keeping the Community College Library Relevant
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Michael Crumpton
Asst Dean for Administrative Services
University of North Carolina at Greensboro
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Nora Bird
Associate Professor
Library and Information Studies Department, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

The traditional community college library no longer focuses on warehousing books or monitoring noise levels, academic libraries now are vibrant and dynamic centers of learning or at least should be. This presentation will focus on trends in academic libraries, including at community colleges, which inspire learning, fosters collaborative study activities and promotes research for students, faculty and community.  Topics discussed include instructional design, embedded librarianship, assessment and advocacy of organizational needs.
Most successful models include campus and community partnerships that provide students the opportunity to learn, create and produce academic knowledge all under one roof, the library.  Community college libraries are an important part of the total campus learning mantra and should be considered as such.  This also includes vocational and technical coursework in which learning about information literacy can be different.

Keeping Them Engaged: staff development activities that entertain, educate and open the door to communication
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Denelle Eads
Outreach and Staff Development Librarian
University of North Carolina at Charlotte/Atkins Library

Based on a Leadership Institute project proposal, this poster session will provide attendees with information and ideas for staff development activities for library staff.  This session will highlight different kinds of staff development opportunities that offer team building, education as well as training and personal development through workshops, presentations and speakers.

Keynote - Closing Session - Women of Mystery
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Margaret Maron
Author
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Charlaine Harris
Author

At the Conference closing luncheon, attendees will be entertained by well known writers Margaret Maron and Charlaine Harris.  The two will talk about their current work, and will entertain us with their "Women of Mystery Tour".  Although this is a free event, tickets must be presented to enter.

Keynote - Ogilvie Lecture
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Courtney Young
Immediate Past-President
American Library Association

Immediate Past President of ALA Courtney L. Young will address the membership.

Young writes: "Since joining ALA, I have been an active and contributing member of the association. I have committed myself to ALA, developing a progressive understanding of our divisions, round tables, committees, and affiliates. I recognize the importance of building bridges between our diverse membership and its many important parts. I am dedicated to diversity in all forms in our profession and our organization. ALA is made up of librarians, library workers, library school students, library-related vendors, and library trustees interested in maintaining the values of the profession while at the same time moving libraries and the association forward.

"My 'start to finish' commitment to the profession and the Association sets me apart. I want to sustain the initiatives we have in place, engage all facets of our membership, and demonstrate the value of membership and of librarianship."
 
The Ogilvie Lecture is an NCLA conference tradition devoted to addressing professional issues in librarianship. It is named in honor of former State Librarian of North Carolina, Phil Ogilvie.

Kickstarting the eCard: Expanding Library Access to Students in Your Community
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Amy Wyckoff
Library Manager
Charlotte Mecklenburg Library
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Martha Yesowitch
Educational Partnerships Manager
Charlotte Mecklenburg Library

Is your library considering establishing an eCard program for students in your community?  Charlotte Mecklenburg Library carried out an eCard pilot during the 2014-2015 school year in partnership with Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools (CMS). 5000 students and their teachers gained access to our electronic resources for educational and entertainment purposes.  Learn from our challenges and successes as we share how this program developed from a pilot into a larger initiative that will grant access to all CMS students in the 2015-2016 school year. Leave with tips for how to start the process at your library system, including ideas for planning, marketing, school outreach, and outcome measurement.  Student eCards - a new wave in library services..

LAMS Business Meeting

Library Administration and Management Section business meeting.

Launch and Focus your Organization's Teams
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Angel Truesdale
Adult Services Specialist
Charlotte Mecklenburg Library

Finding a way to coordinate your organization's teams and work groups can be a difficult undertaking. Collecting information from 400 plus staff, changing staff expectations, and defining team roles are some of the simple tasks to combat a complex issue. The Charlotte Mecklenburg Library System established a system to organize the system's teams, define what a team consist of, and compile the information in one transparent place for staff to view.  Attend this session to focus your efforts, choose what system to explore, and organize staff to produce more efficient teams. 

Leadership Training that Really Works
Julie Walker
State Librarian
Georgia Public Library Service
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David Singleton
Director of Libraries
Charlotte Mecklenburg Library

Leadership academies are everywhere, at the local, state and national levels, in every imaginable format.  But what really works to develop the library leaders that we need today?  A great generation of top-level librarians are retiring, and many communities and institutions are fearful that a new generation of leaders have not been adequately prepared to take the reins of today’s libraries.

This session will explore how innovative, fearless, forward-thinking library leaders are raised.  

 

Learning from LSTA, Part 2: Understanding User Experience
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Aaron Schmidt
Influx Library User Experience
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Susan Brown
Director
Chapel Hill Public Library

This all day preconference offers the chance to engage with two nationally-known thought leaders about trending topics of interest to many different libraries - Data Driven Community Engagement and User Experience Research & Design.  In addition, participants will learn about their local work with Chapel Hill Public Library, made possible through two LSTA grants.

In this afternoon session, Aaron Schmidt - UX expert, Library Journal columnist, and author of Useful, Useable, Desirable - will offer an overview of UX for libraries, including why it’s important, the basics of UX research, and the implications of UX thinking on creating policies and procedures and crafting services and strategies. Also, Susan Brown, CHPL Director, will present an inspirational and informative talk about what she’s learned about UX from frequenting – and reflecting on – Trader Joe’s.

Participants will have a unique opportunity to engage with national experts at a state conference and will leave with a deeper understanding of these two areas of interest and how they can incorporate them into their short and long term plans and goals.

Libraries and the Social Sector
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Lydia Towery
Librarian
Charlotte Mecklenburg Library
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Joetta Pittman
Information Services Manager
Braswell Memorial Library
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John Raynor
Business Reference Librarian
High Point Public Library

The Social Sector, along with Government and the For-Profit sector, is a vital part of the U.S Economy, providing innovative services and solutions from community programs to international campaigns.  As members of the Social Sector, libraries are well-positioned to provide and expand support services to nonprofits.  Join Foundation Center Funding Information Network supervisors, fresh and seasoned, for practical information and useful resources to support your community’s nonprofit social sector, regardless or not of whether your library is a member of the Foundation Center Funding Information Network.  Details, support suggestions, and excitement about becoming a member will be available.

Libraries Serving Patrons with Special Needs and Disabilities
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Viviette White
Sr. Library Services Assistant II
Charlotte Mecklenburg Library
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Katie Cox
Senior Library Assistant
Charlotte Mecklenburg Library

This session will explore ways to design and present programs at the library for patrons with special needs. We will discuss adaptive technology and demonstrate how fidget kits can be used in programs. This session will encourage you to integrate sensory activities into the programs you already do.

We will offer suggestions for books, flannels, picture cards and music, demonstrate storytelling and movement activities, sing songs, as well as create some really great hands-on literacy crafts that can be tied in with any theme. These program ideas can be used for children, teens and adults.

We will discuss person first terminology and show how to engage patrons with special needs in conversation. We will also show how to invite patrons with special needs, along with their caregiver, to programs and how to use the services the library offers.

This session will show participants how to get started with Sensory Programming at their library. We will show participants how to create program ideas, how to market the program, find an audience, set up the room, and deliver an absolutely amazing educational and entertaining expereince that the patrons will want to come back for more.

We will show how to make programs welcoming, relaxed and flexible, starting with a positive attitude and acceptance.

We will demonstrate how to use sensory toys and manipulatives and how to create your own on a budget. We will also have a list of websites of vendors where you can purchase therapeutic toys and fidgets, as well as links to local agencies that can provide a huge amount of support towards the community you serve.

Library Instruction and Learning Disabilities
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Clark Nall
Business/Reference Librarian
Joyner Library, East Carolina University
Carolyn Willis
Outreach Librarian
Joyner Library East Carolina University
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Jeanne Hoover
Scholarly Communication Librarian
East Carolina University

The number of students in higher education with learning disabilities is growing rapidly.  At East Carolina University's Joyner Library, we are collaborating with Project STEPP to improve our information literacy services for students with multiple learning disabilities.  Project STEPP (Supporting Transition and Education through Planning Partnerships) is a program that offers comprehensive academic, social and life-skills support to a select number of students with learning disabilities who have shown the potential to succeed at the college level. 

Our contact with the students includes orientations, pre-semester instruction sessions, library tours, and research consultations. The students also attend a library instruction session with their first semester English class.  We used multiple assessment techniques to measure the program’s impact on student learning outcomes.  We have also benefited from the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) principles advocated by Project STEPP and its parent organization, College STAR.

The presentation will cover assessment findings.  We will discuss our experiences, successes, failures, and future plans.

Library Outreach for Targeted Undergraduate Populations
Suchi Mohanty
Head, R.B. House Undergraduate Library
UNC Chapel Hill

Certain student populations are often underserved served by traditional university programs because of their unique academic and social needs. Learn how the University Library at UNC Chapel Hill is taking a proactive approach to engaging with transfer students, student veterans, and student athletes by studying user needs and demographics, collaborating with campus partners, and talking with students themselves. This poster will profile the Personal Librarian Program for Transfer Students, research support at the student-athlete academic support center, and emerging outreach to veteran students.

Lite Project Managment for Librarians
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Kathy Bradshaw
Human Resources Librarian
University of North Carolina - Greensboro

Have you ever been given a “special assignment” by your manager that ended up being a nightmare before the assignment was completed?   Does the list of the projects that you need to complete keep growing, with no end in sight?   Are you charged with overseeing a building renovation or some other large project that will involve working with numerous people in and outside of your library and you are not sure how you are going to manage everything on time and on budget?  If so, this workshop is for you!  Project management skills are currently in demand and are necessary for today’s librarian. 

This workshop will give participants an understanding of formal project management principles and demonstrate practical application of these processes that can be utilized in any library.   The session will incorporate actual hands-on exercises that will allow participants to put project management principles into practice.   Participants will be required to complete reading assignments prior to the session, and will need to have an idea for a project that can be utilized in their library. 

At the end of this course, participants will be able to:

Gain awareness and understanding of basic project management processes.
Gain greater confidence in communicating with stakeholders of all levels.
Apply the project management techniques utilized in class to a class exercise on project management. 
Use step-by-step project management processes to develop their own project to be utilized in their own library.

Low fences make good neighbors: shared, permeable space in an academic library
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Joan Ruelle
Dean & University Librarian
Elon University

In the summer of 2014, Elon University renovated the first floor of Belk Library to more fully reflect the visual and functional integration of the services of Belk Library, the Writing Center, Academic Tutoring and Teaching & Learning Technologies.  Renovations included permeable, shared spaces to encourage consultation with consolidated experts as well as to foster referrals, collaborative and individual writing, and academic work.  This presentation will share our experiences with integrating spaces and resources across multiple service units that previously had separate delineated locations.  Specific examples include a consolidated service desk and the utilization of shift scheduling (or “hot racking”) to accommodate multiple uses of limited resources over time.    

Mak(ing) Space: Perspectives from a Small Rural Academic Library
Rebecca Freeman
Kaetrena Kendrick
University of South Carolina Lancaster

In many of the current discussions of makerspaces, libraries that are leading the way are public libraries and large academic libraries; however, for smaller libraries, making room for a makerspace program can be challenging. Determining how to maximize budgets, choose interesting projects, and procure and secure materials are just a few of the obstacles smaller libraries may encounter. In this poster we will discuss our experiences with implementing makerspace events into a small rural academic library and explore ideas with attendees for scaling makerspaces to their institutions.

1. Can the parameters of a library makerspace be stretched?

2. What are the challenges of creating a makerspace in small or rural academic libraries?

3. How can makerspaces be scaled to fit the mission, patron interests, and budgets for small libraries?

Make Deselection Matter: The Dark Half of Collection Development
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Jennifer Brax
Assistant Director/Adult Services Librarian
Perry Memorial Library
Patti McAnally
Library Director
Perry Memorial Library

Deselect like you mean it! Collection development gives pretty images of new acquisitions. The other half, deselection, is perhaps even more important than selection. Many librarians perform this necessary task after business hours due to fears of angry patrons and even other staff members. Bring this vital task of collection development into the light. Learn how to speak to staff and patrons about why, how, how much, what, and when. Explain the fear and shock away. Learn how to deselect effectively, and learn to convince patrons and employees how important this task is to the overall health of the library. There is no need for shock, anger, temper tantrums, or hunger strikes. Librarians only need to be prepared for all the questions and comments before deselection begins in order to inform those who have the same goal – the health of the library. Please join Jennifer Brax to bring deselection into the sun with confidence!

Make Health Happen, In Your Library & Community
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Kelly Vadney
Librarian I
Cumberland County Public Library & Information Center, Headquarters Library
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Julia Turpin
Wilkes County Librarian
Appalachian Regional Library

Offering quality, reliable consumer health information resources is a priority for public libraries nationwide. This year, both the Wilkes County Public Library and the Cumberland County Public Library & Information Center launched initiatives to improve and extend the reach of these imperative services. Both institutions aimed to establish themselves as consumer health information hubs in their service areas, partnering with key community healthcare organizations to do so. Join in a discussion on how to create engaging programming, seek out fruitful outreach opportunities, connect with key community stakeholders and maximize marketing efforts. We’ll also chat about getting staff on board and developing training that ensures consistent, quality, health reference services are delivered.

Julia Turpin serves as the Wilkes County Librarian within the Appalachian Regional Library System.  Prior to her service in Wilkes County, Julia served as the Director of the Taylor County Public Library in Campbellsville, Kentucky.  She received her MLS from the University of Kentucky in Lexington, Kentucky.  She lives in North Wilkesboro with her husband, two daughters, dog, and part-time cat.  

Make It Matter: Are you ready to attend the IFLA World Library and Information Congress in 2016?
Rebecca Vargha
Head, School of Information and Library Science Library
UNC Chapel Hill University Libraries
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Breanne Crumpton
GlaxoSmithKline Fellow
North Carolina Museum of Art
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Tamara Rhodes
Online Learning Librarian
East Carolina University

What is IFLA?  The International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) is the leading global organization representing the interests of library and information services and their users.  It is the international voice of our profession and next year IFLA will meet in the United States.  The IFLA World Library and Information Congress will be held from August 13-19, 2016 in Columbus, Ohio.  The conference theme is Connections, Collaboration, Community and here is a link to a video about the 2016 event:  http://conference.ifla.org/ifla82/  If you are wondering what it would be like to attend an IFLA Conference then this session is designed for you!  Three panelists Breanne Crumpton (GlaxoSmithKline Fellow), Tamara Rhodes (ECU) and Rebecca B. Vargha (UNC-Chapel Hill) will share their thoughts and experiences about being active in IFLA and attending global conferences.

Make it Matter: How Schools that provide LIS Education are Working to Improve Diversity and Inclusiveness
Gerald Holmes
Reference Librarian and Diversity Coordinator
UNC at Greensboro Library
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Kim Becnel
Associate Professor of Library Science
Appalachian State University
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Nora Bird
Associate Professor
Library and Information Studies Department, University of North Carolina at Greensboro
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Ismail Abdullahi
Associate Professor
School of Library and Information Sciences, NCCU
Claudia Gollop
Associate Professor
School of Information and Library Science, UNC-Chapel Hill
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Lou Sua
Teaching Assistant Professor
College of Education, ECU

Diversity and inclusiveness are essential to library service.  It is crucial that library education programs help future professionals understand the many dimensions of diversity and key strategies for providing welcoming and inclusive facilities and services.  This panel will include a representative from each of the six training programs in North Carolina (five graduate, one undergraduate).  Each representative will summarize what their program does to promote diversity in the curriculum and to foster inclusiveness in the school.  The panel will be moderated by Gerald Holmes, winner of the 2014 ALA Achievement in Library Diversity Honor.   

Make it Matter: Latino Library Programming and Outreach in Academic and Public Libraries
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Brenda Linares
Outreach Librarian and Coordinator of User Services Graduate Assistants
UNC-Chapel Hill Health Sciences Library
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Yamile Nazar
Community Engagement Professional, Hispanic Services
Durham County Library
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Beatriz Guevara
Library Manager
Charlotte Mecklenburg Library

Academic and public libraries are addressing the unique information and programming needs of Latino library users. Learn how diversity initiatives contribute to better communities by following a few simple steps such as researching your community, knowing your stakeholders, creating awareness, collaborating, and marketing your services.  Diversity programming can only be achieved and sustained by making connections and collaborating with other colleagues, listening to library user needs and being willing to openly consider them.

Obtain ideas for speakers, grants and national/international projects to kick start or develop your library’s outreach. Participants will receive an action plan that will include suggestions for planning and marketing programs.  You will also learn about consumer health information resources in Spanish, created by the National Library of Medicine and other useful health related tools and how to partner with potential collaborators.

You will also receive information on ways to develop Hispanic Heritage Month and other cultural events by two Latino Americans: 500 Years of History grant recipients. The grant intends to promote Latino American history and culture, particularly in geographic areas where the Latino population is expanding. The programming covers dates ranging from the 16th century with the creation of St. Augustine to the year 2013 which covers Latino population projections for the year 2050.  
                              
Exposing all library users to the history and heritage of Latino Americans and how this richness impacts our nation and our specific states is necessary to promote better social-cultural relations and a greater understanding of how the Latino American culture began.

 

Make Your Instruction Matter: Practical ways to implement the ACRL IL Framework in library instruction
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Jenny Dale
Coordinator of First-Year Programs
UNC Greensboro University Libraries
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Kathy Shields
Head of Reference and Instructional Services
High Point University

Implementing the new ACRL IL Framework is a challenging task for instruction librarians. How do we take concepts and turn them into practical, assessable lesson plans that actually accomplish something in 50-75 minutes? How do we make the short time we have with students really matter, and encourage long-term critical habits of mind in our students? In this session, we will focus on how to use the new IL frames as a starting point to create learning outcomes and structure active, engaged instruction sessions. We will reflect on how the IL frames align with current practices and how we can alter or improve our practice to align with the frames’ emphasis on metaliteracy and metacognition. This interactive session will allow time for participants to share their own experiences working with the new Framework and brainstorm potential lesson plans for each frame. Participants will leave a better understanding of the frames and the framework as a whole, as well as sample learning outcomes and lesson plans for each frame.

 

Making Assessment Matter: Tales of Collection Evaluation
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Amanda Binder
Social Sciences Librarian
UNC Charlotte
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Sara DeWaay
Arts & Architecture Librarian
University of North Carolina, Charlotte
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Liz Siler
Non-Serial Electronic Resources Librarian
UNC Charlotte
Karna Younger
Atkins Library Fellow
UNC-Charlotte/Atkins Library

Librarians at UNC Charlotte will present on different approaches to collection evaluation.  One approach is aimed at the electronic resources supporting the Political Science and History Departments.  Another focuses on physical resources for the Music Department and School of Architecture.  And the third reviews a new e-book collection program. The projects share common goals: understanding the relationship between collections and user needs, promoting underutilized resources, and identifying potential areas of collection growth.  Included in this discussion will be the unique methodologies and purposes of the individual projects.

Making Connections: Strategies for funding collaborative community engagement projects with archival and digital collections
Jennifer Motszko
Manuscript Archivist Librarian
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro
David Gwynn
Digital Projects Coordinator
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Community-engaged scholarship is a high priority for The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) and community outreach is an important priority for the University Libraries. Since 2013, several initiatives at UNCG have combined collection development, community outreach, digitization, and creative external funding sources, and have provided a model for future projects. This presentation will examine three of these initiatives:

  1. The Fisher Park Neighborhood Association Records were accessioned through traditional outreach and were digitized with funding from a municipal grant acquired by the community group before it donated the materials.
  2. The Community Collections project involved community outreach, collection surveys, and experimental field-based digitization techniques, and was funded through a UNCG Community-based Research Grant.
  3. The Hayes-Taylor YMCA Young Achievers Digitizing Greensboro History Explorers Program program utilized field-based digitization techniques and community outreach to mentor at-risk youth while expanding their interest in the history of their community. This project was funded by a federal IMLS Sparks!Ignition grant.

The speakers will discuss how each project has revealed new methods of relationship-building within the larger community and how each has served as a model for further collection development and digitization activities.

Making History Matter: Wikipedia edit-a-thons at UNC and Duke
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Therese Triumph
Science Librarian
Kenan Science Library, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
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Emily Jack
Digital Projects and Outreach Librarian
North Carolina Collection, Wilson Special Collections Library, UNC-Chapel Hill
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Mireille Djenno
Librarian for African, African American, and Diaspora Studies
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill/Stone Center Library
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Kim Henze
Artists' Archives Fellow, Research+Design Graduate Assistant
UNC Libraries, SILS
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Kelly Wooten
Research Services and Collection Development Library
Duke Univeristy, Rubenstein Library

The presentation will describe the series of Wikipedia edit-a-thons hosted by the UNC-Chapel Hill and Duke Libraries in the spring of 2015.

One of the reasons librarians and academics are skeptical of Wikipedia as a credible research source is the lack of consistent citation practices and inclusive subject matter. Recently, concerns have also been raised about the profile of the typical Wikipedia editor (predominantly white, English-speaking, well-educated males) and the potential biases introduced by the lack of diversity of the editing population on the range of subjects covered.

The edit-a-thon events, which bring together people interested in creating, developing, and enhancing Wikipedia entries, are an attempt to address these concerns in a collaborative and social way. The library-hosted events emphasized the importance of research best practices while engaging multiple literacy skills, as well as highlighting the excellent library resources available at UNC and Duke respectively. At UNC Chapel Hill, a series of edit-a-thons on the theme “Make History!” covered several under-represented groups, including North Carolina American Indians, women artists, African American US soldiers, and women scientists. Duke’s events have focused on women with connections to Duke University.   

The panelists will discuss the outcomes of this series of events; explain some of the benefits of hosting an edit-a-thon; and share resources, tips, and advice for librarians seeking to host their own edit-a-thons.

Making Internships Matter: the What, Why, and How of Creating a Successful Library Internship Program at your Library
Michelle Hildreth
Branch Manager
Wake County Public Libraries/Green Road Library

Wake County Public Libraries has offered internships at its libraries for many years, however they have only offered a more structured system wide internship program since 2011. Though it can be a lot of work to host an intern at your library, the program has proven mutually beneficial to both the interns and Wake County Public Libraries. Many of our previous interns are now permanent employees within Wake County. Their experiences not only helped them decide what career path they should take, but created opportunities for them to jump start their career. In turn, interns provide opportunities for libraries to tackle special projects that otherwise may be impossible to complete. The structure of Wake County’s internship program and how it has evolved will be presented. Ideas for how the structure can be used by any library, big or small, to create a successful internship program will also be offered. Data that illustrates why internships are beneficial to the profession as a whole will also be shared.

Making It Happen With Steam
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Alicia Finley
Youth Services Specialist
Charlotte Mecklenburg Library
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Alesha Lackey
Children's Librarian
Charlotte Mecklenburg Library

Libraries are consistently working towards following best practices to support educational trends and in the development of fostering lifelong learning skills that can enhance the lives of our constituents; this applies especially with librarians and paraprofessionals working with preschool and school age children. Noticeably, STEM education is becoming an increasing focus in schools with science and technology jobs steadily growing. On March 23, 2015 President Obama announced that over 240 million dollars would go towards supporting STEM education programs. This initiative will help to fund hands-on programs that provide children with that exposure and encourage students to work in STEM related fields because there is a great need. This presentation will creatively focus on sharing programming ideas that incorporates art into STEM. The STEAM movement involves science, technology, engineering, art and math.  Presenters will demonstrate engaging STEAM activities that will include using basic electronics to make scribble bots, and incorporating basic computer coding into library programs. Participants will learn through hands-on play with activities that they can use to engage children and families. Information will be shared about how library programmers can look within their community and develop partnerships with other organizations, such as hosting events during the NC Science Festival that is offered each year in April. They will be informed and empowered to go out and incorporate activities that encourage learning through STEAM activities. Attendees will leave with valuable resources, replicate activities learned, and discover ways to develop other exciting STEAM programs that educate and generate fun.  

 

Making It Matter with Online Content: NCpedia
Laurie Reeves
Systems Support Librarian
State Library of North Carolina
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Kelly Agan
Digital Projects Librarian
N.C. Government & Heritage Library, State Library of N.C.

NCpedia, the online encyclopedia of North Carolina developed and maintained by the State Library of North Carolina, presents its experience with developing and sustaining site design and functionality and content and relevance to users in the ever-changing landscape of technology and user needs and expectations. NCpedia began as a brochure in the 1970s and 1980s and has now grown to be a robust, responsive, and respected resource for North Carolina information.

NCpedia is an important resource for students, educators, and researchers who want to find reliable information about North Carolina quickly. It was migrated to Drupal in 2010 and since 2012, more than 4,500 new articles and over 20,000 place descriptions have been integrated from multiple partners, all with only minor changes to the user interface. A usability study and needs assessment in 2014 gave a blueprint for “making it better”: from an updated and enhanced user interface to content development.  

N.C. Government & Heritage Library staff will share the changes that have been made since 2014 and answer the key questions: How do we know what will matter to users (usability and community needs assessment studies)?  What do we need to do to make it matter (implementation of usability and needs assessment studies and defining outreach channels)? And how do we determine that it has mattered (harnessing feedback and usage statistics)?  We’ll also share tips for users, offer hands-on website demonstrations, share our lessons learned, and engage the feedback of participants to keep “making it matter.”

Making it Matter: Lessons learned from a Volunteer Driven Technology Mentoring Program
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Laura Chapman
Adult Services Assistant II
Fontana Regional Library/Jackson County Public Library

Making it Matter: Lessons learned from a Volunteer Driven Technology Mentoring Program

In 2012, we offered our first computer classes in our new facility at Jackson County Public Library.  Initially our classes were designed for people who had little to no knowledge on how to use a computer.  Basic classes such as Email, Basic Internet and Basic MS Word were taught by volunteers and staff. The 90 minute “Jumpstart” classes were often filled to capacity. After the first year, the library saw a drop in attendance in these classes.  The data showed us patrons wanted a higher level of training on topics such as editing digital images, facebook, MS Excel.  The Technology Mentors developed new offerings which increased the numbers, but also demonstrated the “One Class fits All”, was not working for many. 

With this new data the Jackson County Public Library and our technology volunteers created the One-on-One Technology Mentoring Program.  This program not only personalizes the support, but also offers assistance for patrons on their personally owned devices.  Many of the patrons using this service are seniors who are new to the use of technology and how they can access library and other online resources.  

In this session, we will share the evolution of this volunteer driven service.

Making the Library Matter: Enhancing Library Engagement with the Greensboro College Community
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Olivia Miller
Public Services Librarian
Greensboro College
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Anna Pinks
Collections Services Librarian
Greensboro College James Addison Jones Library
Will Ritter
Library Director
Greensboro College / Jones Library

In May 2014 the James Addison Jones Library saw a complete overhaul of its staff. After 10 and 20 years of dedicated service, two thirds of the staff left the Library. Since then, a cohort of fresh, young librarians have taken the reins in a renewed effort to revamp the Library’s image within the Greensboro College community and to increase student, faculty, and staff involvement in Library services, activities, and decisions. Through planning and hosting events, creating new spaces and collections, developing new connections with campus communities, and engaging in more aggressive collection management, the Library works to nurture its rebirth as a core component of a liberal arts college. We will talk about the ups and downs encountered in this on-going journey toward fostering a greater campus engagement with the Library.

Making the Most of Social Media: Strategic Planning for Effective Engagement
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Erin Lawrimore
University Archivist
University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Most librarians don't have "manage social media" as part of their job description, yet many of us do just that (or, at least, recognize its current and growing importance). With an understanding of platforms available and a strategic plan in place to guide social media efforts, librarians can engage with audiences through social media without distracting from their primary job responsibilities (or without having to resort to the unsustainable "get an intern/volunteer to do it" plan). In this session, we will use the case study of UNCG University Archives' social media development to explore various social media platforms, the need for a strategic communications plan, and methods for assessing social media value. While the examples used come from a university archives, the lessons learned can be applied in any library where staff are looking to engage their community using social media.

Managing Change: Your Role in Strategic HR Initiatives
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Michael Crumpton
Asst Dean for Administrative Services
University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Libraries of all types are changing and this impacts job functions and activities at many levels, including non-supervisory, supervisory and administrative.  This session will discuss the basics of strategy as it relates to organizational change and how this impacts various roles within the library organization.  Creating a strategy to meet the demands of a changing profession takes the involvement of everyone and understanding the process and expectations of creating that strategy is important to ensure a clear understanding of what happens and why.  This session will present methods of strategic planning and how you can support the process.  Based on the monograph, “Strategic Human Resource Planning for Academic Libraries”, discussion will include public and special library needs as well.

Minding the Gap: Ensuring Transfer Student Success in Information Literacy
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Vonzell Yeager
University Studies Librarian
UNC Wilmington
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Anne Pemberton
Associate Director, Library Assessment and Instructional Services
University of North Carolina Wilmington, Randall Library

This poster will outline the Information Literacy (IL) requirement of the new General Education program at the University of North Carolina Wilmington and will address how transfer students and “native” UNCW students differ in IL skills. The steps in the creation of an IL exam for General Education competency credit for transfer students, identification of campus partners, student test groups, test versioning and the compilation and use of psychometric data to improve the exam will be shared. Unique aspects of the IL test, including the inclusion of a research essay, will also be provided.

The University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW) implemented a new General Education curriculum entitled “University Studies” in the fall of 2012.  University Studies is divided into six areas: Foundations, Approaches and Perspectives, Thematic Disciplinary Clusters, Building Competencies, Explorations Beyond the Classroom, and Capstone Courses. Within the area of “Building Competencies,” students are required to complete courses in the categories of Writing Intensive, Qualitative and Logical Reasoning, and Information Literacy (IL). University Studies requires at least nine hours of information literacy intensive courses and three of these hours must be completed within the student’s major. In the spring of 2013, UNCW identified transfer students as a population disadvantaged by the required IL competency because of collective articulation agreements and the unique features of University Studies within the UNC system. Anne Pemberton and Vonzell Yeager were charged with the development of an information literacy exam to provide IL credit to transfer students.

NC LIVE Lightning Rounds
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Rob Ross
Executive Director
NC LIVE
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Heather Greer Klein
Member Services Coordinator
NC LIVE

When most library staff hear "NC LIVE" they tend to automatically think about library databases. This is likely because NC LIVE has served 200 North Carolina libraries with a core collection of digital content for more than 15 years. In addition to providing databases though, NC LIVE staff and advisory committees have worked on a number of projects and initiatives designed to benefit libraries across the state in a variety of ways.

In this session, NC LIVE staff and committee members will provide lightning round updates that will showcase the wide variety of collaborative work being done to help NC LIVE member libraries support education, enhance economic development and improve quality of life in their communities. Participants will have an opportunity to hear about exciting new projects and initiatives NC LIVE has planned for the upcoming year. At the end, time will be set aside for improptu lightning rounds from audience members who would like to (in three minutes or less) share a successful project, initiative or story about how they or their patrons have benefited from NC LIVE in their local community. 

NC LIVE Past, Present & Future - An Open Discussion Forum with NC LIVE Leaders
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Rob Ross
Executive Director
NC LIVE
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Katherine Winslow
Director of the Library
NC Wesleyan College, Pearsall Library
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Cal Shepard
State Librarian
State Library of North Carolina

Since its beginnings in 1998, NC LIVE has served all North Carolina libraries with equitable access to a core selection of digital content and services, and has saved the state millions through its collaborative efforts. Many things have changed since that time, but NC LIVE’s mission remains the same - to help libraries in their efforts to support education, enhance economic development and improve quality of life. NC LIVE leaders invite all North Carolina library staff and interested parties to this session to hear from them about what they see as the core tenets of the NC LIVE philosophy, and to discuss the many opportunities and challenges faced by the consortium and libraries across the state. 

During this session, attendees will have an opportunity to ask questions of a panel representing NC LIVE’s leadership, including its governance board, the NC LIVE Librarians Council, and staff. NC LIVE leaders hope to begin a fruitful discussion that broadens the understanding of NC LIVE’s purpose and organizational values, while hearing from participants and thinking together about the future of the organization.  

NCLA Endowment Dinner

Join your colleagues and friends at the Blandwood Mansion for an evening featuring entertainment by the Igbolade Jazz Group and a cash bar. Transportation will be provided. The ticket price of $60 is tax deductible and the benefits go toward the NCLA Endowment, which supports scholarships, grants, advocacy, leadership development, and the leadership institute.  

NCLA Student Ambassador Program – Giving Youth a Voice, Gaining the Attention of Legislators
Anthony Chow
Associate Professor
UNCG LIS Department
LaJuan Pringle
Charlotte Mecklenburg Public Library

Our presentation will introduce the NCLA Student Library Ambassador program, which involves k-12 students entering a statewide contest about the impact of libraries and a free trip to Washington to meet with legislators on Capitol Hill.

We have invited a panel of former student ambassadors to talk about their experiences and NCLA advocacy co-chairs will discuss impact and possible replication at the local county and municipal level.

Next Chapter Book Clubs
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Julie Whittaker
Youth Services Librarian
Davie County Public Library

 "The mission of the Next Chapter Book Club is to provide meaningful opportunities for lifelong learning, social connections, and authentic community engagement for people with developmental disabilities through weekly book club meetings that include people with all reading levels."   http://www.nextchapterbookclub.org/  Clubs meet in various locations, book stores, coffee shops, restaurants, and libraries to fulfill the requirement of meeting in open view in a ‘public location.’

Davie County Public Library learned of the opportunity and trained with the NCBC Coordinator for NC, Deborah Woolard, who started clubs in association with the Piedmont Down Syndrome Support Network. http://pdssn.org/programs-3/next-chapter-book-club/ DCPL started an NCBC for Adults during the summer of 2014. As a Youth Services Librarian it was easy to recognize the need for enhanced services for the IDD population in our library.  NCBC was embraced and has developed into a joyous celebration of reading and literature.

We are fortunate to have volunteers and assigned mentors to assist with the group. Everyone loves the experience. Moreover, we marvel at the growth witnessed as participants continue to develop skills reading, understanding and discussing the chosen materials.

This poster presentation includes photographs, audio/video of a meeting, literature about the program and getting started; examples of the materials created and selected works used.

NMRT Pub Crawl

Come join the members of the New Members Round Table as we explore the bars and breweries of downtown Jamestown.  Cost is $25.00 per person, and includes transportation.  All profits from the Pub Crawl go to support the NCLA Endowment, with the benefits going toward scholarships, grants, advocacy, leadership development, and the leadership institute.

Bus schedule:

Depart Koury 6:30pm & 7:45pm
Return Koury 9:30pm & 10:15 pm

Participating venues:

The Deck at River Twist
118 E. Main St.
Jamestown, NC  27282
336.207.1999
http://www.thedeckatrivertwist.com

Southern Roots
119 East. Main St.
Jamestown, NC  27282
336.882.5570
http://www.southernrootsfoods.com/contact.html

Potent Portables
115 E. Main St.
Jamestown, NC  27282
336.882.9463
http://www.potentpotablesnc.com/

The Full Moon Oyster Bar
103 W. Main St.
Jamestown, NC  27282
336.307.2887
http://www.fullmoonoysterbar.com/

Perky’s Bistro
105 W. Main St.
Jamestown, NC  27282
336.887.3460
http://perkysbistro.com/contactus.html

North Carolina Librarian on Main Street
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Nancy Tucker
Business Librarian
Mauney Memorial Library, Kings Mountain, NC
Sharon Stack
Jan Harris
Director, Kings Mountain Main Street Program
City of Kings Mountain

Are your community’s downtown businesses alive and vibrant?  If not, has your library broken down walls to reach downtown businesses on their turf?  In this presentation, participants will learn how a small library in Kings Mountain partnered with its city’s Main Street™ organization and Planning and Economic Development department to help small businesses be successful in the 21st century marketplace and in return, the program has benefited downtown revitalization efforts.  This program is a powerful example of how the library has facilitated, through partnerships, a transformation downtown and triggered small business success and economic growth.  You will learn strategies to reach small businesses and other organizations in your community. 

At the end of this session participants will:

  • understand the importance of partnering with downtown revitalization and economic development organizations to illustrate the relevance of library resources to small business success, thus making ordinary reference extraordinary.  
  • receive guidance to successfully create a similar program or activity at their library. 
  • increase their knowledge of how public librarians can embed themselves in the community. 
North Carolina Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped
Gina Powell
Outreach and Volunteer Services Librarian
North Carolina Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped

The North Carolina Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NCLBPH) is the public library for North Carolinians who can't read regular books due to a visual, physical or learning disability.  This session will explain what the NCLBPH does, who it serves and how.  It is a lecture style presentation with Power Point slides, with a hands on element where participants can look at various books and equipment the library provides to its patrons.  Public Libraries are qualified to be institutional patrons of NCLBPH, and there will be discussion of the processes of how both individuals and institutions become library patrons. 

North Carolina Library Schools Reception

Please join us for the Joint North Carolina Library Schools Reception on Thursday, October 22nd from 5:15 – 6:30 PM.  Reception for all alumni, students, faculty and staff of the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, the University of North Carolina-Greensboro, East Carolina University,  North Carolina Central University, Appalachian State University and Central Carolina Community College.  Meet and mingle with your colleagues and School representatives in a cheerful setting. We provide delicious snacks and beverages.  Free event, but ticket required.

North Carolina state government publications—just a click away!
Denise Jones
State Publications Clearinghouse Liaison
State Library of North Carolina
Monica Figueroa
Eve Grunberg

In recent months, the North Carolina state government publications digital collection has witnessed a number of significant additions. Patrons, researchers, and North Carolina enthusiasts now have full, online access to important state agency publications, including the North Carolina Manual (1874-2012) and the North Carolina Supreme Court and Court of Appeals opinions (1778-2012), as well as Wildlife in North Carolina (1937-present). This session will discuss the useful resources housed in the state government publications digital collection and provide tips for searching and navigating the collection. Presenters will also discuss the creation and use of metadata to improve patron access and discovery.

On the Same Poem
Shelby Stephenson
NC Poet Laureate

The NC Center for the Book presents NC Poet Laureate Shelby Stephenson, who will read his poetry and answer questions from the audience.

One Size Does Not Fit All: Helping Non-Traditional Students Succeed
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Mendy Ozan
Health & Human Services Librarian
Atkins Library, UNC-Charlotte
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Karen Grigg
Science Liaison Librarian
University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Alison Bradley

Academic libraries strive to provide services and support for all segments of the student population. Many students entering college today are bringing skills and experiences that differ from those of “traditional students” who enter college straight from high school. Today’s students may be veterans, transfers, international students, high risk, or lifelong learners who are balancing work, family, and school. These students have unique concerns and may need different types of services and support in order to succeed.

In this session, a panel of academic librarians will discuss the programs and services their libraries are using to meet the needs of a diverse student population. Community college librarians and college/university librarians will have the opportunity to learn about programs at other libraries and establish a dialogue with each other to help improve services to non-traditional students.

Open Educational Resources at UNCG- Alternatives to Pricey Textbooks
Beth Bernhardt
Assistant Dean for Collection Management and Scholarly Communications
UNC Greensboro
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Karen Grigg
Science Liaison Librarian
University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Attitudes towards college textbooks and other course content are rapidly changing. Spiraling costs have made textbooks a political issue in some states. As a result, librarians have begun to take notice, reversing course on the traditional library view of textbooks. A number of libraries are looking for more affordable ways for students to access textbooks. Many are leveraging open educational resources (OER) as alternatives to expensive, commercially-published textbooks.

UNC Greensboro University Libraries and the Office of the Provost joined together to provide Open Education “Mini-Grants” initiative to encourage instructors to use low-cost or free alternatives to expensive course materials; these can include open access scholarly resources, library-licensed and owned resources, and learning objects and text that faculty create themselves.  This presentation will focus on what are Open Educational Resources, where to find them, and how the library can encourage faculty to think about alternatives to their pricey textbooks.

Opening Keynote: State of North Carolina Libraries
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Dale Cousins
NCLA President
North Carolina Library Association
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Rodney Lippard
Director, Learning Resource Centers Information Commons
Rowan-Cabarrus Community College
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Wanda Brown
Associate Dean of the Z. Smith Reynolds Library
Wake Forest University
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Kathy Parker
Library School Media Consultant
Department of Public Instruction

Are you curious about what’s happening in libraries across the state of North Carolina?  Wondering how other libraries are coping with some of the same issues you are?  If so, please join us in our opening session, The State of North Carolina Libraries.

Each panelist brings a unique perspective to the table.  Dale is a retired public librarian from Wake County Libraries, Rodney is currently the director of the Rowan Cabarrus Community College Library, and Wanda serves as the assistant dean of the Z. Reynolds Library of Wake Forest University.  

The panel will answer questions from the audience, as well as from social media.

Peer Joy: Maximizing the Value of Peer-to-Peer Learning with Student Employees
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Cara Evanson
Information Literacy Librarian
Davidson College
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Meredith Pintler
Peer Research Advisor
Davidson College

The benefits of peer-to-peer learning are well acknowledged in a classroom setting, but what about outside of the classroom? Student employees provide a level of approachability and relatability that enables libraries to more effectively promote library resources and services. Student employees form a natural bridge between student patrons and librarians. They are able to utilize their student role to teach fellow students in a unique context librarians cannot provide on their own. The Peer Research Advisors (PRAs) at Davidson College advance peer-to-peer learning through patron interactions, student employee training sessions, and outreach projects. More experienced PRAs assist newer PRAs in learning skills at the desk and concepts such as privacy and copyright. We will highlight how the Davidson PRA Program demonstrates the value of peer-to-peer learning and how we hope to build on our current approach.

Personal Librarian: Who Is Mine or How Do I Get One!?
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Richard Moniz
Director of Library Services
Johnson & Wales University
Valerie Freeman
Instruction Librarian
Johnson & Wales University, Charlotte


Personal Librarian: Who Is Mine or How Do I Get One!?
 
Personal Librarian programs are not very common but have a radical potential to impact student retention and success. The two presenters, pulling from a book which they recently published through ALA, will present the following:

  • History of Personal Librarian programs – what are they and who has them?
  • PL and Library Instruction – how does a PL program interact with instruction programs?
  • PL and embedded librarianship – they may overlap but they are not the same thing.
  • Outside the box ideas for innovation within a PL program – personalize, personalize, personalize!
  • Faculty responses to PL – what does faculty have to say about PLs?
  • Best Practices for PL programs – setting one up? Keep these ideas in mind.

The session will incorporate some interaction such as surveying the audience to determine what elements of a PL program they may already have in place.
Participants will come away with the knowledge necessary to create a Personal Librarian program adapted to the realities and needs of their particular library or institution.

Picture Perfect: Transforming the Library Tour with Instagram
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Elizabeth Marcus
Undergraduate Experience Librarian
Hunter Library, Western Carolina University

You've seen the blank stares, yawning, and texting.  Students must be thinking, "When will I ever use these resources?"  "Why should I care?"  You need a creative way to orient folks to your library.  Look no further!

To enhance the undergraduate experience at Western Carolina University, members of Hunter Library's research and instruction team sought a new way to introduce students to the library.  Librarians explored alternatives to traditional tours and found that some libraries were using Instagram.  In summer 2014, an Instagram self-tour pilot was launched.  Students were given a specific task and asked to post their findings on Instagram.  Photos were then shared and discussed with librarian input.

This poster will illustrate how Instagram can be used in library orientations.  Visitors will learn how to plan, promote, implement, and assess Instagram tours in their libraries.  Though presented from an academic library perspective, the Instagram tour principles can apply to any library setting.  

Practical UDL for the One-Shot Library Instruction Session
Amy Harris Houk
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Jenny Dale
Coordinator of First-Year Programs
UNC Greensboro University Libraries

Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is an instructional design philosophy focused on providing access to education for students with learning differences. UDL has been used in K-12 classrooms for decades and is moving into higher education. UDL uses three main concepts, each corresponding to a different brain network: multiple means of representation, multiple means of action and expression, and multiple means of engagement. Much of the literature on UDL in the college classroom centers on traditional, semester-long classes, but many of the principles are relevant to teaching librarians or anyone who leads workshops or professional development. Multiple means of representation means that content is presented in a variety of formats. This could include handouts, screencast tutorials, or graphic organizers. Multiple means of action and expression involves giving students a variety of ways to learn and to express what they have learned. In library instruction, this might involve allowing students to share successful keywords by online poll or in writing. Multiple means of engagement means providing students with a variety of ways to engage with the material. In library instruction, this might mean allowing students to work either alone or in groups, providing feedback, and minimizing distractions. In this presentation, we will provide a basic introduction to the three principles of UDL and provide examples of typical library instruction activities that attendees can modify using one or more of the principles. The presenters will model the three main principles and demonstrate activities that can easily be integrated into information literacy sessions.

Programming with LibGuides
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Suzanne Moore
County Librarain
Ashe County Library
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Sarah Spanburgh
Adult Services Librarian
Ashe County Public Library

LibGuides seem to be used traditionally for sharing complied lists of resources and information. This session will show examples of how LibGuides can be used for creating not only program information, but programs themselves to allow patron interaction. One example is a type of online community readers' advisory (Ashe 2015 Reading Challenges) to solicit patron comments on books they read. Other LibGuide programs include Get Crafty and Mountain Music.   LibGuides can also be used for a variety of book clubs, festivals or community reads.   Find out how LibGuides can be used to promote programming and recruit volunteers. 

Project Management 101
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Laura Wiegand
Coordinator of Discovery Services
UNC Wilmington

When done right (or at all!) project management (PM) can help deliver collaborative projects that are completed on-time, within scope and with organizational buy-in. This presentation will discuss how to apply the formal principles of project management and team leadership in a realistic way to library projects. We will focus on pulling out the concepts of PM that are most pertinent to the types of projects and collaborative structures found in libraries, as well as pointers for effective team leadership which successful project management relies upon.

Public Library Section Wine & Cheese Reception and meeting
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Diane Chamberlain
International Best Selling Author
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Jason Rogers
Library Manager
Wake County Public Library

Diane Chamberlain, N.C. Author

Diane Chamberlain is the international bestselling author of 24 novels, many set in North Carolina. Join PLS for an afternoon of listening to Ms. Chamberlain speak while drinking wine and nibbling on cheese!  PLS will also have a short business meeting and present the William Roberts Public Library Distinguished Service Award.

Cost:  PLS members $15 * All others $20

R.A.C.E: Helping Freshmen to Start Strong and Reach the Finish Line
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Michael Frye
Staff Development and Science Librarian
Winston-Salem State University

Bewilderd eyed freshmen enter our doors every fall.  For many academic libraries they offere a variety of sessions throughout the year. However,  many only have one shot. How do you share with over 800 students the resources and  services available and the importance of them in their academic success?  R.A.C.E provides students with a hands own experience with the library and answers FAQ's before the first day of class. Patterned loosely on the game Amazing Race, Ramtastic R.A.C.E is an acronym that recognizes that Realizing. Academic. College. Excellence begins with using library services and having the skills necessary to be information leterate in our every changing global society. Discover how you with the help of your library staff  can use this concept to develop an engaging experience for freshmen that will ensure they have the skills they need to be successful in the classroom and beyond.

RASS Business Meeting
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Jeanne Hoover
Scholarly Communication Librarian
East Carolina University

Reference and Adult Services Section Business Meeting.

Reaching beyond the Ivory Tower: The Role of Academic Libraries in Fostering Community Life-Long Learning
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Kathelene McCarty Smith
Archivist, Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and Archives
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Jackson Library
Keith Phelan Gorman
Head of Special Collections and University Archives, Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and Archives
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Jackson Library

By custom and practice, academic libraries identify students, faculty, alumni, and scholars, as their principal users.  While these institutions reside in a larger community, they sometimes find it difficult to reach non-academic populations. The perception of colleges and universities as “ivory towers,” further categorizes academic librarians as disengaged with user groups beyond their walls. To alter the public perception and demonstrate the social value of academic libraries, librarians must be willing to open their doors and make their collections and resources accessible to broader, often overlooked communities. In the case of The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG), these communities included middle and high school students and teachers as well as residents of local retirement facilities. As community engagement is a cornerstone of the University’s mission, the University Libraries sought to engage with these groups, providing education and access to physical and web-based resources, and creating an investment in the life-long learning of the community. Active engagement with students, educators, and retirees reintroduced the academic library as an approachable environment in which to explore historically significant material, valuable online resources, and the subject matter expertise of the librarians. This presentation will show how UNCG re-imagined the role of the academic library within the community and will explain how a success outreach program can alter preconceived ideas about academic libraries, increase the accessibility of its collections, and change perceptions within and outside the walls of academia.

Reaching Digital Readers Where They Are
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Julie Raynor
Readers' Services Supervisor/Facilitator of Digital Download Services and Programs
High Point Public Library

Many libraries are experiencing inconsistent circulation of their digital collections. In an attempt to remedy this, some libraries have taken to using social media avenues to communicate with their users about these collections. This presentation will feature the social media avenues one public library uses to reach out to library users and will highlight some of the social media marketing campaigns that have been the most effective. The presenter will detail how she uses Facebook, email marketing, and LibGuides to reach her current digital readers and to reach new ones as well. The presenter will also invite attendees to share what social media approaches have worked in their locations to promote their digital collections.

Reaching Patrons on Mobile Devices
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Gwen Exner
Phil Blank
NCKnows

NCknows has developed an app for NC libraries that now allows North Carolina patrons to chat with a librarian 24/7 (except sat/sun Midnight-8am) on their mobile devices through their local library. If local NC libraries are interested, they can choose to have their own librarians answer their own patrons when convenient and then have the NCknows group answer during their off-hours, or simply offer the service to their patrons without staffing at all. In addition to chatting, we will demonstrate how this app allows patrons to access information about NC libraries, how they can make use of your libraries' FAQs, and how this may change the future of remote library services. We'll also review the extremely successful experiments with proactive chat conducted by Orange County Public Library and NC LIVE. More info at http://ncknows.org/app

Real Learning Connections
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Michael Crumpton
Asst Dean for Administrative Services
University of North Carolina at Greensboro
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Nora Bird
Associate Professor
Library and Information Studies Department, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

The Real Learning Connections project is a collaboration between the University of North Carolina at Greensboro Library and Information Studies (DLIS) department and the University Libraries (UL). The project combines graduate assistant tuition waivers from the department and a stipend from the University Libraries for twenty hours of work.  The internships are based on special projects that were solicited from the various departments of the UL with two forming an initial pilot project, and three being accomplished in the second year.  The projects required learning objectives from the faculty supervisor, the librarian supervisor, and the student. Progress was documented by reflective journaling, regular meetings, and knowledge products created.  The poster will describe the workings of the Real Learning Connections model, the benefits to the participants, and the extension of the work to several other initiatives including incorporation of mentorship into the classroom and extension to virtual internships.  The effort to connect practical experience with theory and academic instruction is a long-standing issue in library and information science (LIS) education.  LIS educators often enter into an internship relationship with an attitude that the student is the sole locus of learning. This model conveys an interaction between student, practitioner and educator that creates a learning environment for all participants who are expected to meet learning objectives and create a tangible outcome or product.

 

Reflections on a Digital Project: Digitizing Diversity
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Karen Feeney
Special Collections Librarian
Forsyth County Public Library
Amy Ruhe
Technical Services Assistant
High Point University Smith Library
Corrine Luthy
Digitization Intern
Forsyth County Public LIbrary

Increasing diversity in collections and access through digitization are currently two hot topics in libraries and archives. In this presentation you will learn how the Forsyth County Public Library combined those two topics into a digitization project for minority and women’s collections. These collections were created by civic groups founded by women and educational institutions founded by African Americans in Winston-Salem during the 20th century. Grant writing, budgeting, selecting materials, creating metadata, and marketing the collections will be covered. Great information session for those interested in beginning a digitization project in their library.

Ribbon Cutting/Exhibits Opening
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Dale Cousins
NCLA President
North Carolina Library Association
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Rodney Lippard
Director, Learning Resource Centers Information Commons
Rowan-Cabarrus Community College

Please join President Dale Cousins and Vice-President Rodney Lippard, along with Rob Ross of NCLIVE, Shae Tetterton of Equinox and Candy Adams of Driving-Tests.org as they open the Exhibit Hall for the 61st Biennial Conference.

Round-up Your Collection: Weeding for the 21st Century
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Kate Engelbrecht
Librarian
Charlotte Mecklenburg Library
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Anne Masters
Branch Manager
Charlotte Mecklenburg Library

How do you tackle weeding a neglected, 36,000 item nonfiction collection?  With a carefully crafted yet flexible plan.  Learn how to analyze and create a modern nonfiction collection, cultivate staff buy-in and decrease the foot-print while increasing the relevance of your collection.  Library nonfiction collections today must meet very different needs than even 5 or 10 years ago.

RTSS Business Meeting
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Anna Craft
Metadata Cataloger
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Resources and Technical Services Section business meeting.

Scaffolding for Success: Information Literacy in the Post-Secondary Developmental Classroom
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Maria Fesz
Public Services Librarian
Coastal Carolina Community College
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Davonna Thomas
English Instructor and Developmental Coordinator
Coastal Carolina Community College

Based on the most recent Nation’s Report Card data, 22% of eighth graders did not score at or above “partial mastery”of skills “fundamental for proficient work” for reading comprehension. These students fall even further behind during high school. Many of these students walk away with diplomas in hand, excited about going to college in the fall. They attend orientation, plod through the requisite placement tests, and are dismayed to find out that their first-year course plans have been derailed due to mandatory developmental coursework. These students are asked to write papers which incorporate and cite outside sources within the first few weeks of their college careers, yet they lack the information literacy skills and confidence needed to do so. Instructors and librarians are faced with a challenge: How do we address these gaps in knowledge, all while bolstering students’ confidence?

The co-presenters will share their experiences of implementing a scaffolded model for developmental information literacy instruction as part of a new Developmental Pathways course sequence at their institution. They will briefly cover the foundational underpinnings of developmental studies as well as the relevant background information on NCCC’s new DRE curriculum and Coastal’s fledgling course sequence. The presenters will follow with concrete examples of student-library interaction from various stages in the sequence. These will be connected with information literacy outcomes. This interactive session will offer practical solutions for both librarians and developmental instructors, including how to scaffold library experiences to align both horizontally and vertically across developmental course sequences.

Shaping the Future: Increasing Library Impact in Title I Schools Through Strategic Planning and Partnerships with Public Libraries.
Anthony Chow
Associate Professor
UNCG LIS Department
Karla Regan

Our presentation will share the results of our study on a random sample of libraries in Title I schools and the impact of strategic planning and building closer relationships with their public libraries. School libraries are traditionally underfunded in comparison to their peers and previous research has found that the use of strategic planning positively impacts teacher, student, and school perceptions and understanding of the critical role libraries play in overall student achievement and success. What would their impact be on libraries in Title I schools?

In addition a valuable community supplement to a school library is its local public library. How closely did they work with them and what impact did a closer relationship have on students, parents, and the community?

Using a mixed-method research design, we will present first-hand accounts from school librarians, the contexts in which they work, and the impact strategic planning and partnerships with area public libraries had on their respective libraries.

Shedding Light on the Leadership of Librarians
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Kira Berggren
School Library Media Coordinator
Hillbrook High School

Based on the results of a mixed methods dissertation study conducted in Louisiana in 2013, which illustrated how positive relationships between administrators and librarians often led to increased awareness and promotion of the importance and relevance of library programs in academia and the community, I combined the professional roles of library media specialists/coordinators.  Thus, the six combined professional roles of librarians were determined as follows: collaborator, technology integration specialist, professional development provider, collection manager, advocate for library programs, and literacy leader.

Since then, I have created an instrument combining action research results from across the country with the Rubric for Evaluating North Carolina's School Library Media Coordinators, that I will share at the presentation.

How can we collaboratively paint North Carolina librarians as pioneers of research and catalysts for integration of the latest technological advancements occurring in a state known for its Research Triangle?  The ultimate goal of this presentation is to enable state-wide collaboration by equipping participants with a toolkit of resources and talking points designed to help them achieve exemplary scores on annual evaluations and educate stakeholders about the importance of 21st century library media programs.

Sikhism: Religious Resources and Symbolism at the James E. Shepard Memorial Library at North Carolina Central University
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Danielle Colbert-Lewis
Reference Librarian
North Carolina Central University James E. Shepard Memorial Library
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Hafsa Murad
Information Literacy Librarian
NCCU
Karen Grimwood
Curriculum Materials Center Librarian
NCCU/ James E. Shepard Memorial Library
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Jamillah Scott-Branch
Head Reference Librarian
North Carolina Central University

This session will highlight religious resources and prominent symbols related to the religion of Sikhism.  In 2014, the reference librarians of the James E. Shepard Memorial Library at North Carolina Central University (NCCU) created a LibGuide titled Resources About Sikhism and Sikh Americans.  The idea to create this LibGuide originated at the Triangle Scholarly Communication Institute (SCI) in November 2014.  At this institute, the James E. Shepard Memorial Library reference librarians collaborated with faculty from the Departments of History and English and Modern Languages at NCCU to work on a project titled: Presenting Positive Information about Sikhism Beyond the Textbook. The project centered on ways to use technology to present information about this religion beyond the traditional social studies textbook. This collaboration led to the creation of the first LibGuide dedicated to Sikhism that presents online, print and social media sources about the religion.

skillfUL – Creating Effective Digital Design and Technology Workshops
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Jennie Goforth
Research & Design Services Librarian
UNC-CH / Undergraduate Library

Drop-in workshops can fail so miserably. A lot of staff time can go into a program that ends up with few, if any, attendees. At UNC, the Undergraduate Library has been offering workshops through its Design Lab for several years. And only recently have we hit on a model that seems to work: the skillfUL Tech Workshop series. In this presentation, I will discuss the evolution of this programming – and how we finally arrived at the content, timing, logistics, and marketing strategies that work.

These workshops focus on digital design topics, and like any technology training, they have special challenges. I will discuss creating technology instruction that is effective; so that attendees walk out of the classroom not only with new tech skills but also with new conceptual knowledge that will outlive the specific tool taught and have longer-lasting impact.

Social Media : Strategies for Success
Nancy Dowd
Kathleen Moore
Pam Jaskot
Consultant/Trainer
NoveList

Social media is a powerful and effective marketing tool for libraries and one with great potential.  Join Nancy Dowd, co-author of the popular blog "The M Word", and Pam Jaskot, Consultatnt with LibraryAware, as they discuss the various social media platforms, each platform's advantages and disadvantages, and strategies for marketing success.  Nancy and Pam will help you navigate the social media labyrinth and create or enhance your map for success.  They will be joined by LibraryAware graphic designer Kathleen Moore, who will give design tips for pushing your message using social media.

Social Media Hacks: Tips & Conversation for Enhancing Social Media Use in Libraries
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Stephanie Willen Brown
director, Park Library
the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
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Matthew Clobridge
Library Webmaster
Durham County Library
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Jennifer Lohmann
Adult Services Manager
Durham County Library, Southwest Regional

This session will help library staff enhance the social media they are already using. We will cover five elements of social media: practical applications; policies; gaining visibility; analyzing engagement; and resources beyond Facebook and Twitter.  

We will start with practical aspects of using Facebook and Twitter, including how we use them in our academic and public library settings. This will include topics like sharing social media duties and creating a succession plan for those duties. 

The policy discussion will cover the development and use of a social media policy. We will also address the challenges of having a personal and professional social media account. Finally, we will talk about archiving social media posts as mandated by state law. 

Visibility is one of the biggest issues in social media and that discussion will include advertisements, interacting with followers, and the social media activities of the libraries in Ferguson and Baltimore. 

Engagement means little these days if you can’t measure it. We will talk about how to monitor raw numbers, such as number of followers and page views, as well as patron interaction with our social media posts, and illustrate ways to improve interaction.  Finally, we will talk about social media sites we use in addition to Facebook and Twitter, such as Meetup, Instagram, Hootsuite, and Storify.    

This session will start with a discussion by the moderators and will be followed by small group discussion on topics of interest, with time to report back to the whole group. 

Speed Interviewing

NCLA’s New Members Round Table (NMRT) is pleased to offer Speed Interviewing! We’ll provide hiring managers from a variety of different types of libraries. They’ll each ask you one interview question -- you’ll answer it and then get immediate feedback on your response! Move from one interviewer to another, with a maximum of five minutes at each interview station. Find out how you come across to potential employers, and experience a variety of interview questions and techniques!

Starting a Makerspace on Zero Dollars a Day: An Introduction to Free or Inexpensive Maker Resources
Brown Biggers
Systems Programmer
University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Michelle Folkman
Instructional Technology Specialist
Davidson County Community College

Maker Spaces are for everyone and all ages and can be done on a budget.  Learn about the possibilities of maker spaces with minimal initial expense.  Many resources are available either as free, close-to-free, or open source software packages.  Learn about these resources and how to get started with them. 

Are you curious about makerspaces?  Wondering where best to begin when faced with limited funds and growing interest?  Join our speakers as they show how makerspaces are for everyone and can be done on a budget.  Recipients of a LSTA Maker grant and librarians will share what they learned in developing best practices to bring makerspace planning and development to librarians.  Learn about free, low-cost, and open-source maker resources and how these can be integrated into your exisiting collections and services.

State Library Update
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Cal Shepard
State Librarian
State Library of North Carolina

Join State Librarian Cal Shepard for all the news on the most recent developments at the State Library of North Carolina including: News from the Government & Heritage Library and Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped; News about activities from the Library Development consultants; Exciting new projects, activities and opportunities, and; Upcoming events.

Step Away from the Desk: Circulation Issues in Today's Libraries
Jenny Boneno
Library Manager
Forsyth County Public Library
Cathy Fletcher
Library Service Specialist
Charlotte-Mecklenburg Library
LaCreasha McCloud
Library Coordinator/Supervisor
Charlotte Mecklenburg Library (CML)
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Carla Hollar
Library Manager
Swannanoa Library

Panelists will discuss library hot topics and present creative and innovative ideas for those tricky circulation situations relevant to today's libraries.  Panelists will actively seek audience participation and questions.

Stop Guessing, Start Testing: Easy and Affordable Usability Testing for Public Library Websites
Nathan Whitt
Information Services Manager
Cumberland County Public Library and Information Center
Daniel Pshock
User Experience Research Assistant
UNC Libraries

Few public libraries have staff, much less entire departments, dedicated to user experience (UX) or usability. Even so, usability testing and other evaluation techniques for websites are not out of reach. Thanks to affordable, easy-to-use software and high-quality, freely available usability scripts, librarians can conduct their own testing. Or, as was the case with the Cumberland County Public Library & Information Center, they can also work with local library and information science (LIS) students to unearth usability issues through testing. Rather than predicting how a website is used or should be organized, learn how to gain direct insight from your users.

Story Walks, Story Books, Story Readers
Jane Blackburn
Director of Libraries
Appalachian Regional Library
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Judith Winecoff
Youth Services Librarian
Appalachian Regional Library
Jackie Cornette
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Elizabeth Lee
Youth Services Librarian
Wilkes County Public Library

Appalachian Regional Library will showcase its 2104-2015 LSTA-funded project, Story Walks, Story Books, Story Readers, which was designed to make reading more accessible and fun to children aged four to eight who are not currently library users.  ARL created Story Walks at places other than the library to reach children and families who might not know about or be able to get to the library for a story time. We advertised library story times at the Story Walk locations as well, inviting families to the library.  We purchased e-readersto loan out and loaded them with a range of children's books so that children who might not have access to e-readers or books at home would be able to experience both reading and technology. The primary outcome of our project was that more young children in our region now have increased access to enjoyable reading experiences.

Story Walks, Story Books, Story Readers
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Judith Winecoff
Youth Services Librarian
Appalachian Regional Library
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Lisa Flanigan
Youth Services Assistant
Appalachian Regional Library/Watauga County Library
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Elizabeth Lee
Youth Services Librarian
Wilkes County Public Library

The Appalachian Regional Library's Storywalk started from a patron's request and from there it blossomed.  Storywalks are a self-directed learning opportunity and are an engaging way to promote literacy and the library.  The StoryWalk® Project was created by Anne Ferguson of Montpelier, VT and developed in collaboration with the Vermont Bicycle & Pedestrian Coalition and the Kellogg Hubbard Library. The Appalachian Regional system was fortunate to receive the Library Services and Technology Act grant in 2014, which enabled our system to create several storywalks in the community, along with the purchase of Kindle E-readers.  Thanks to a dedicated staff and invested leadership we were able to make the storywalks come alive in our community. 

The storywalk project is adaptable to various locations. They may be located in parks, playgrounds, or any walking location. They may also reach families who may not be library users or have books in their homes.  This unconventional way to experience a book emphasizes the pure joy of reading, while also providing a literary experience in a fun and engaging manner. Storywalks are adaptable and may be tailored to fit the unique needs of the community.

Through the creation of storywalks our library system has learned some valuable lessons. What to do and perhaps what not to do, and questions to ponder along the way.  The presentation will demonstrated how to create a storywalks as well as provide samples of Kindle E-readers.  As a part of our presentation we would like to engage participants to go on a storywalk with us in the conference if possible, allowing NCLA participantes to share in the joy of storywalks.

 

Storytelling Workshop with Brian Sturm
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Brian Sturm
Associate Professor
UNC Chapel Hill

This workshop will address skills and techniques for the librarian storyteller (of all abilities) to build confidence and develop new strategies for finding, preparing, and presenting oral stories.  A brief exploration of the difference in storytelling and reading aloud will be discussed.

Storytime Gymnastics: The Art of the Mixed-Age Storytime
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Brytani Fraser
Librarian- Conover and Claremont
Catawba County Library System
Carole Dennis
Children's Librarian
Hickory Public Libraries/Ridgeview Branch
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Melissa Hager
Children's Librarian
Alexander County Library
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Lisa Neal
Head of Youth Services
Hickory Public Library

Four experienced storytime leaders from small and rural libraries offer a real conversation about keeping your sanity while leading storytimes for multiple ages and stages. We’ll talk about the pro's and con's of offering a mixed-age storytime, share tips and experiences on selecting books, transitioning between activities, addressing learning styles and ECRR practices, and involving adults. We'll also answer some age-old questions like, “Do themes really matter?” and "How long should my storytime be?" Presentation will be 30 minutes long with 30 minutes of Q and A and open sharing.

Strategic Planning and Performance Dashboards
Anthony Chow
Associate Professor
UNCG LIS Department

Strategic planning provides a systematic process for engaging both the organization and the community it serves. As part of this process goals are identified along with the necessary resources and tactics needed to achieve them. Once the strategic plan is in place, however, how does the organization know its progress in realizing achieving its goals and plan? 

This presentation will demonstrate the process of strategic planning adopted by a number of library systems across North Carolina and how to design, develop, and implement a performance dashboard that allows library directors the ability to check on their progress in real-time and rate the percentage that has been achieved on an annual basis.

 

Success of a Teaching Garden
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Nicholas Covington
Library Associate
High Point Public Library
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Mark Taylor
Librarian
High Point Public Library

On February of 2014 we established the High Point Public Library Teaching Gardens. We have had many successes and challenges with this project and we’d like to share our experiences with libraries that are thinking about having gardens in their communities. This presentation could also help libraries that already have gardens and may be looking for ideas on how to expand or simply improve their project.

Our vision for the garden is to teach people how to grow and cultivate their own food and to give to back to the community through cooking classes, teaching garden classes, and giving produce to the less fortunate through community nonprofit groups. The expectation is that more volunteers will take on the duties and responsibilities of maintaining, growing and creating programs for the library and build upon the framework that Mark and I have created in partnership within our community. 

As the Teaching Garden moves into its second year, new opportunities have opened up and allowed us to expand the “teaching part” of the garden by trying out new ways to grow vegetables. When we started the garden, we were using raised beds, we are now experimenting with straw bale gardening and will soon have a garden inside of 2 car tires. A third option that we are exploring is using wooden pallets to grow vegetables in. All of these growing techniques are designed to show people in the community that you do not need an expansive garden to grow food, a little space and some creativity can go a long way. Our project dovetails into the bigger mission of the High Point Public Library of: sharing the power of knowledge, strengthening the sense of community, and enhancing cultural and economic vitality.

 

Summer Reading Maximized: Think People, Not Prizes
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Kim Becnel
Associate Professor of Library Science
Appalachian State University

Each and every year, librarians devote tremendous amounts of time, energy, and money into preparing and producing creative summer reading programs. We want to believe they are worth our efforts, but what does the data say? Are these programs effective? If so, what is it about them that really makes a difference? Once we know, we can target our efforts to create the most successful summer reading programs possible. The presenters will begin by highlighting what current research has to say about what motivates kids to read and what keeps them reading. We will then discuss the results of focus groups we held with North Carolina fourth-graders. We spoke to three groups of students who had participated in their local public library’s summer reading program and three groups of students who had not. We’ll share what these students had to say about why they participated (or not) in these programs and what they felt they got out of the experience and link these results to research on incentives and motivation. Finally, for public and school librarians who conduct summer reading programs, we will provide specific suggestions for how to maximize participation and completion in these programs while creating positive, meaningful experiences that young patrons won’t soon forget.

Sustainable Collaboration: Successful Professional and Paraprofessional Collaboration in an Academic Library Green Team
Jennifer Smith
Serials/Documents Specialist
Elon Univeristy, Belk Library
Randall Bowman
Archives Librarian
Elon University
Vicki Siler
Emerging Technologies Librarian
Elon University
Linda Lashendock
Video Archive Technologist
Elon University, Belk Library Archives
Sandra Kilpatrick
Head of Acquisitions
Elon University
Judy Hamler
Cataloging Specialist
Elon University

In this poster you will see how professional and paraprofessional library staff in a medium-sized university library successfully collaborated to create a library green team.  The process not only enhanced professional and staff development, but created sustainable changes within the library that furthered the overall institutional goals of creating a more sustainable campus.  With sustainability being a major institutional priority for this university some of the library staff members were already involved in sustainability efforts on a campus-wide level.  Wishing to further sustainably specifically within the library, a green team was formed with both professional and paraprofessional staff with an interest in sustainability to look at ways the library itself could be more sustainable and how the library could use library resources to educate the students, faculty, and staff of the institution about sustainability.  The successful collaboration created a team of engaged staff that worked together to brainstorm ideas, create goals, and accomplish those goals.  During their very successful first year, the 2013-2014 academic year, the team was able to reduce energy use, increase recycling, create more sustainable staff kitchen policies, take part in a pilot project for the university’s Office of Sustainability, facilitate an energy audit of the library building, have the library’s fist ever event for Earth Day, create a LibGuide for students about sustainability, attended sustainability webinars as a group, give presentations to their co-workers about sustainability, and generally be the “go-to” folks on staff to answer questions about sustainability and solve sustainability issues that arose.  The result of this successful collaboration has been a more sustainable library, a better understanding of sustainability among the library staff as a whole, and a strengthening of the library’s connection to the university’s institutional goal of creating a more sustainable campus. 

TEACHing & Fair Use in the 21st Century Classroom
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Cheryl Coyle
Sr. Librarian
Central Piedmont Community College
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Mark Coltrain
E-Learning Librarian
Central Piedmont Community College

Higher education today makes connecting with learners from all over the world as simple as a mouse click. However, as college faculty and staff develop everything from individual learning objects to full courses to meet the needs of these diverse populations, knowing where copyright laws begin and end can be much trickier; most times very challenging.  In a time where films, music, and images have become so convenient to reuse and remix for educational purposes, it is hard to know when someone’s rights are being violated and when you are within your rights as an educator.  Is your next click, copy right or copy wrong?  Many librarians think about this all the time and can often provide creative solutions to faculty and staff copyright questions. This interactive session will introduce a discussion of the TEACH Act and Fair Use laws and include some real world examples of how copyright issues are all around us. 

 

Technical services careers: A world of possibilities
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Anna Craft
Metadata Cataloger
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro
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Nicole de Bruijn
Technical Services Manager
Wilkes County Public Library
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Emily Vorhies
Technical Services Librarian
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (CenterScope Contractor)
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Lauren Reno
Head, Rare Materials Cataloging
Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University

The library world is ever-changing, and jobs in technical services are no exception. With the near-constant evolution of library standards, systems, and services, personnel in technical services have no shortage of new things to learn.
Panelists in this session will bring a diverse set of experiences--including representation from academic, public, and special libraries--to the discussion of the changing role of library technical services. Speakers will address the skills needed in their departments, current and future job prospects in their areas of work, and what technical services departments are looking for in potential new colleagues. Whether you're interested in learning more about technical services work or trying to figure out what career options technical services has to offer, this session is for you.

Technology and Trends (TNT ) Round Table Business Meeting

This session will be the regular business meeting of TNT. We will hold elections for new officers, review the past biennium, and solicit feedback from members. 

The Digging Durham Seed Library: How our seed library is growing
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Jenny Levine
Reference Librarian
Durham County Public Library

Just over a year ago, Joanne Abel brought the Digging Durham Seed Library into existence with help from the Durham Library Foundation, her many contacts in the local gardening community, and the amazing staff of the marketing department at DCPL. Since then, our community has given a lot of positive feedback about the program. After a full year of seed library presence, our next steps will be to evaluate and improve the system however we can. I took over most of the Seed Library day-to-day tasks in March 2015, and, along with the seed library contacts at four of our branch libraries, have kept the program running. We are fortunate in North Carolina not to be restricted by any laws in providing free seeds to our patrons. I learned a great deal about the national (and international) seed library movement during a recent conference in Tucson, AZ. My presentation will include information about how our seed library program works, and hear any suggestions from librarians across the state.

The Durham Comics Project: Crowdsourced Anthologies, Drinking & Drawing, and the Innovative Comics Contraption
Patrick Holt
Adult Services Librarian
Durham County Library - Southwest Regional
Amy Godfrey
Creator of the Durham Comics Project

The Durham Comics Project is an anthology of autobiographical comics that capture the essence of life right now – small moments, big moments, moments that represent the Durham community. Learn first-hand from the project’s organizers how your library can teach community members to tell their stories through pictures, and get tips on turning a unique body of work like this into a professionally-produced comics anthology, plus a special appearance by the Comics Contraption. No drawing skills required!

Amy Godfrey is the creator of the Durham Comics Project and the former Children's Manager at Durham County's Southwest Regional Library, where she ran the DCL Kids Comics Club and co-organized the library's annual Durham Comics Fest.  She runs monthly Drink & Draw nights in Durham and is a contributor to the Durham Comics Project book, which was published by Durham County Library in October 2014.

Patrick Holt is an Adult Service Librarian at Durham County's Southwest Regional Library, where he runs Senior Game Day and the Sub-Genre-O-Rama Book Club, and promotes the comics and graphic novel collection whenever possible.  He's a co-organizer of the annual Durham Comics Fest, as well as a designer of and contributor to the Durham Comics Project book.

 

The Expanding Role of the Academic Liaison: Balancing Subject Versus Functional Skills
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Richard Moniz
Director of Library Services
Johnson & Wales University
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Marla Means
Reference Intern and Liaison Practicum Student
UNC Greensboro
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Steve Cramer
Business Librarian
UNC Greensboro

For liaison services, subject knowledge used to be enough. Now functional skills are increasingly important -- academic libraries are expanding their outreach and advocacy efforts into data curation, scholarly communication, information literacy, distance education services, etc. How should libraries balance these two types of liaison roles? Should libraries hire functional specialists to partner with the subject liaisons, or somehow train subject liaisons to pick up the needed functional expertise? And how should these functional and subject specialists be organized and managed? Two librarians representing a small and large library and a LIS student doing an independent study on liaison trends will lead a discussion on these questions. With help from the participants, we will conclude with suggested best practices.

Between them, the presenters have written books, articles, and blogs on trends in liaison roles and liaison organization.

The Library as an Incubator of Global Engagement
Orolando Duffus
Diversity Resident Librarian
University of North Carolina at Greensboro

The poster presentation will examine how and why the Library created a diversity and global engagement expo that attracted multicultural student groups and a plethora of participants with varying ethnic backgrounds. This forum was a unique event that gave faculty/staff and students an opportunity to engage in the diversity on campus. The expo was instrumental in that is:

A.        Assesses how a collaborative event improves use and communication between the library and the campus community.

B.         Explains how the diverse and inclusive nature of the event affirms the library as the intellectual and cultural hub of the University.

C.         Assesses the event’s added benefits relating to collection development, service offerings, and planning.

Abstract:

Human beings are ethnocentric; we often see the world through our own narrow view and judge the world by what is familiar to us. This event created a dialogue about uncomfortable topics such as discrimination and stereotyping. Having these difficult conversations helps the Library to develop a strategic vision that will accommodate and promote optimum transparency and inclusion of all the members within the university’s community.

This poster walks through the ways in which the Library utilizes the Diversity Resident Librarian to partner with other university departments to create a new campus initiative. The pool of diverse beliefs and thoughts provided useful insights that impacted the new strategic vision of the library and the university. 

The Little Library that Could: Big Impacts from a Small Library
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Julianne C. Moore
Branch Manager
Iredell County Public Library: Troutman Branch

Libraries are constantly growing and changing to meet the needs of the communities they serve. Similarly, I am always looking for new ways to engage with our community. As a result, programs held at our library are “outside of the box.” I credit this success to the following method that I have implemented at my branch library with a staff of 2 full-time employees and 1 part-time, including myself.

Communicate, Collaborate & Create! These are the 3 C’s to having a big impact in YOUR library community.

  • Communicate: Become known in your community both inside and outside of the library.
  • Collaborate: Form partnerships with other institutions, organizations, and individuals who want to make a difference.
  • Create: Once you have made connections and aligned your ideas, you can create programs that meet the needs of the community YOU serve.

During this session I will share how my small library has made a big difference in the community we serve by following this method. I will present the ways that I have become involved in the local community. I will share the organizations, institutions, and individuals that we have formed partnerships with. Additionally, I will provide programming ideas for children, teens, and adults from programs that we have had at our library. For instance, Cake Decorating, “Let’s take a hike!,” Community Day, Spelling Bee, Open Mic Night, Lego Club, Polar Express, Love your Library, Community Garden, Flowerpot Painting and many more!

The SHARE Program - Reaching Homebound Seniors & Engaging Retirement Facilities
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Pam Lyon
Library Assistant / SHARE Provider
HIgh Point Public Library

What do you do when you have been an avid reader all of your life, but can no longer visit the library?  Sometimes you need the library to visit you.  One answer is our library's SHARE Program (Senior Homebound Adult Reading Enrichment).  We provide materials to homebound senior citizens.  Our SHARE representative personally selects books and movies for our SHARE participants.  Then, every six weeks, she visits the patrons' homes to deliver their materials.  In addtion, activities directors of local retirement facilities may enroll to receive movies or materials for group activities.

Out of our deliveries, a secondary mission has developed.  We now provide programs at retirement facilities on a quarterly basis.  These programs vary according to what best suits each facility, but usually involve live music, a sing-a-long, trivia or ice breaker questions, and modest giveaways.  Some groups choose a combination of music and a craft activity led by the SHARE representative.  These activities have been enjoyed by the library staff as much as the residents.  The music and activities have developed a sense of community and outreach that extend in both directions.
 

The Three Rs of Faculty Outreach
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Catherine Tingelstad
Public Services Librarian
Wake Tech Community College Health Sciences Library
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Angela Davis
Instruction & Web Services Librarian
Pitt Community College Library

The three Rs of library faculty outreach are relationships, research guides, and a reputation…for working with teaching faculty. At Pitt Community College Library and Wake Tech Community College Health Sciences Library, librarians are using a variety of strategies to reach out to faculty and identify the needs of their students. Faculty members serve not only as instructors but also as information resources for their students. If faculty members are aware of the libraries’ services and resources, they are likely to communicate this information to their students. This will be a presentation that will include time for an open discussion where attendees can share their ideas.

The Top 10 Things I Wish I Had Known Before RFID; A Public Library's View on RFID
Megan Bowers
Library Associate
High Point Public Library

This presentation would be based on a webinar I presented for Technology and Trends Roundtable.  It focuses on the things we wished we had known before switching to RFID.  This information would have allowed us to be better prepared and to have a more effective experience during the tagging process and the transition to using RFID.    I’ll also talk briefly about expectations for the use of RFID.  The poster session would be useful for libraries considering RFID or for libraries about to transition to RFID.

The presentation could also discuss how to effectively use volunteers for this project.

The Ultimate Library/Faculty Collaboration for Transformative Teaching
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Forrest Foster
Head, Information Commons & Access Services
Winston-Salem State University/ O'Kelly Library
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Carl Leak
Associate Director/Health Sciences Librarian
Winston-Salem State University/O'Kelly Library
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Terrence J. Martin
O'K Scholars Coordinator
Winston-Salem State University/C.G. O'Kelly Library

The Ultimate Library/Faculty Collaboration for Transformative Teaching

 

In this session, presenters will highlight The O’K Scholars Institute.  This institute is a collaboration among faculty and administration that encourages a shared community of knowledge for implementing best practices into the use of technology in teaching, learning and the research process. The Institute has provided faculty members with relevant information about combining effective teaching strategies, library resources and services to accomplish the goal of producing information literate graduates.The presenters will discuss and explain the institute’s origins, which will then lead to marketing and promoting strategies for the institute. The presenters will also showcase and discuss effective collaborative activities that benefited well with the faculty.

In project management, there are always failures and teachable moments. Presenters will highlight these memorable failures and teachable moments; discuss the future of the institute, moving forward with or without the new ACRL framework and sustaining faculty incentivizing participation.

This Is Your Library on Chrome: Perspectives on Chromebooks in Libraries
Garrison Libby
Reference Librarian
Tidewater Community College
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Jess Bellemer
Director of the Library
Hood Theological Seminary
Jason Richmond
Library Associate
Orange County Public Library

Google Chromebooks, laptops powered by Google’s Chrome operating system and designed to operate primarily through the cloud, have recently emerged as a low-cost, low-maintenance alternative to traditional Windows or Mac laptops, making them a great fit for use in libraries. In this presentation, three librarians from three different types of libraries (public, community college, and specialized academic), will discuss their experiences with making Chromebooks available for circulation to library patrons. They will share the benefits and drawbacks of Chromebooks as a platform, and also discuss the circulation programs they have designed to fit their particular institutions. Time will be allowed for questions and answers to help you determine if Chromebooks are a good fit for your library.

To Listen and To Teach: How Distance Education Librarians are Making it Matter
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Tamara Rhodes
Online Learning Librarian
East Carolina University
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Melinda M. Livas
Distance Services Librarian
C.G. O’Kelly Library, Winston Salem State University
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Kelly McCallister
Distance Education Librarian/Assistant Professor
Appalachian State University

Online teaching has been an integral part of the educational landscape since the beginning of the 21st century. Within the last 10 years, it has experience unprecedented growth. Because of this trend, librarians are experimenting with creative ways to connect distance students to library services and resources. There are a number of challenges and there are no one-size-fits-all methods. So how can librarians make library resources and services matter to online students? In this panel presentation, three distance learning librarians will discuss how they fulfill the needs of their online community through: (1) asynchronous instruction in Blackboard, (2) embedded librarianship, and (3) a distance education student advisory committee. Each will outline their process from realizing a need to the trial and error of making their efforts matter.

Top Tech Trends of 2015
Chad Haefele

What were the major technology trends in 2015? What can we predict about what’s coming next? What impact does this all have on libraries? Come see our panel of library technology luminaries discuss their insights into what was big, what flopped, and what libraries should be positioning ourselves to take advantage of next.

Our panel discussion will consist of each speaker giving a brief presentation, followed by discussion and ample time for questions and answers with the audience. Our speakers will come from a variety of library backgrounds, providing a balanced perspective on how the technology shifts of 2015 have impacted libraries across North Carolina.

Transportation - All Conference Reception

Those holding tickets to the All Conference Reception will ride the bus to the Greensboro Historical Museum if they choose not to drive.  Please reserve and pick up your ticket from the Registration booth.  Tickets must be turned in before boarding the bus.

Transportation - Pub Crawl
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Sarah Lyon
Library Professional
Unaffiliated

Transportation is included in the price of the ticket for the NMRT Pub Crawl.  Please reserve your slot at the registration desk and pick up your ticket before boarding the bus.

Troubleshooting Digital Resources with Confidence
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Heather Greer Klein
Member Services Coordinator
NC LIVE

Troubleshooting digital resource issues can be a challenge. Databases return errors, PDFs won't load, passwords don't work---and library users expect library staff to know what is wrong and how to fix it. Many staff are surprised to discover that these issues are easier to address than they first appear. Empowered by an understanding of some important technical concepts and an awareness of basic troubleshooting strategies, all library staff can feel confident assisting patrons who are having trouble.

In this session, you’ll learn about the resource access cycle and what digital resource concepts like authentication, proxy, and IP mean. You’ll learn how to identify the most common digital resource problems and how these problems affect the patron experience. You’ll also learn basic browser troubleshooting, how to understand an error message, the special challenges of discovery (i.e. search box) errors, and the simple steps you can take that will help vendors resolve issues ASAP.

 

Tweeting Where Our Users Are
Scott Goldstein
Web Librarian
Belk Library and Information Commons, Appalachian State University
Dea Rice
Digital Projects Librarian
Appalachian State University

In the spring of 2015, Belk Library and Information Commons put in place a more robust social media strategy. This new plan centered on making Twitter the primary focus of the library’s creative energies as a way to avoid social media glut. As we came to appreciate Twitter’s unique ability to “glue together” multiple social media channels, we decided to feature an embedded Twitter timeline on the library’s homepage. Our research indicates this is an underutilized and underestimated technique for attracting our users’ attention. We base this conclusion on comparative analysis of other academic library homepages and our own analytics data, using both Google Analytics and Twitter Analytics. Not only does featuring an embedded Twitter timeline engage our audience, but the data can be useful for deciding what and when to tweet so as to maximize its impact.

Universal Design for Learning: Considerations for Academic Libraries
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Brandon Stilley
Evening Reference Librarian
Joyner Library at East Carolina University
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Christine Andresen
Instructional Design Librarin
East Carolina University/Laupus Library
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David Hisle
Coordinator of Instruction and Graduate Student Outreach
East Carolina University / Joyner Library
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Clark Nall
Business/Reference Librarian
Joyner Library, East Carolina University
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Jeanne Hoover
Scholarly Communication Librarian
East Carolina University

Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is an important emerging trend in higher education.  The goal of UDL is to make the curricula, learning objects, and learning environments accessible to all students.  This is achieved by considering the learning needs of the broadest possible population.  UDL focuses specifically on those students with learning differences.  This presentation will discuss applicability of UDL principles in academic libraries and the results of an exploratory survey of North Carolina academic librarians on the awareness and adoption of UDL principles.  This project began as a faculty learning community at East Carolina sponsored by College STAR, a UNC-wide program that aims to transform campuses into welcoming environments for students with learning differences.  Preliminary findings suggest that many librarians in North Carolina are encountering students with learning differences although librarians’ familiarity with UDL principles is not widespread.  Participants will leave the presentation with a greater awareness of UDL principles and some concrete suggestions for implementation.

Updated Staff Workroom - on a Budget
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Anne Masters
Branch Manager
Charlotte Mecklenburg Library

Changes, changes, changes.  Everywhere you look, libraries are changing the way they do business.  But have the staff workrooms kept up?  Main Library went from a staff of 25 in Information Services to a staff of 10, but the workroom was the same as it had been for 20 years.  Learn how we rearranged, repurposed, and accommodated more with very little financial resources.  See best practices for staff buy-in.  Learn from our successes and mistakes and enjoy a more productive, aesthetic work environment.

User-Centered Design, Information Architecture, and Website Usability: Two Case Studies
Anthony Chow
Associate Professor
UNCG LIS Department
Michelle Underhill
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Elizabeth Acevedo
Laura Brown
Adult Services Librarian
Granville County Public Library

Our presentation will detail the stories of two different web projects – the North Carolina Digital Collections and VAWnet.org (Violence Against Women web portal)  – and describe the concept and process of user-centered design (UCD), how it guides a website’s information architecture, and how to both design and test for increased usability.

We will explore the research literature, examine best practices, and describe the process used for both studies along with handouts and electronic resources so that attendees can replicate the process on their own.

Utilizing Data to Improve Physical and Digital Library Services
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Rachael Winterling
Usability Assistant
J. Murrey Atkins Library, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Usability study's allow researchers to collect qualitative data about a product. Incorporating data analytic tools such as Google Analytics, HTML_CodeSniffer, and Morae into a study support findings with quantitative data. Analyzing the qualitative and quantitative data will increase the functionality, efficiency, and desirability of a product.

Google Analytics, HTML_CodeSniffer, and Morae support and improve the distribution of library information and services to its users. The three tools together provide valuable data about how effective, efficient, engaging, error tolerant, and easy to learn a service is by analyzing users’ interactions with the product. The data captured by Morae, HTML_CodeSniffer, and Google Analytics is vital for a library to make data driven decisions to its services/products. This session will focus on the importance of analytic tools to user experience and how the data produced can influence recommendations and changes to a service/product.

The poster will include visual aids and infographics of compiled quantitative and qualitative data from the three tools. The presenter will discuss the importance of translating data into nontechnical terms. Attending this poster session will increase participants’ knowledge of quantitative and qualitative data. In addition, participants will gain knowledge about utilizing data to support decisions made to physical and digital library services.

Vendor Preview

Sneak peek before the Conference officially begins of our Vendor Exhibits!  Vendor bingo and door prizes will be available!

Vendor Reception

Please join us for light refreshments provided by our Vendors.  Take a moment while in the Exhibit Hall to talk with our vendors and review their wares.

Virtual Reference: Trends on International, National, and State Levels
Anthony Chow
Associate Professor
UNCG LIS Department
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Rebecca Croxton
Doctoral Student / LIS Instructor
University of North Carolina at Greensboro

This presentation will detail the findings of a five-month study conducted on behalf of the State Library of North Carolina that examined trends relating to statewide and collaborative virtual reference services.  This study examined virtual reference services on a national/international, statewide, and local basis with over 300 participants using a mixed-method approach of qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis. In particular, the study examined funding, staffing, service, and management models of collaborative virtual reference models across the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom as well as the perspectives of North Carolina library patrons, administrators, and NCknows staff. 

Findings from the nationwide analysis suggest 30% of states in the U.S. provide statewide virtual references services, though such services appear to be in decline.  Two staffing models prevail - less than 24/7 staff with only volunteers and 24/7 service staffed by volunteers and paid after-hours staff.  Statewide services are primary funded through LSTA funding only, consortia funding only, or a combination of the two.  Four primary management models prevail – managed by a state library, a consortium, a public library, or a private company.

In North Carolina, the statewide virtual reference service is called NCknows and it has been a valued service by users, librarians, and library administration although a small number of academic and public libraries represent the majority of all transactions.   Historical usage trends will be shared and a state wide needs assessment found that North Carolina libraries feel the service is important and are committed to collaborating to help provide a mutually beneficial service that will enable all libraries to provide 24/7 virtual reference services for their patrons. 

Well Begun Is Half Done: Developing Effective Student Learning Outcomes
Amy Harris Houk
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Kathryn Crowe
Associate Dean for Public Services
University of North Carolina at Greensboro

A successful instruction session or program always begins with clear and intentional learning outcomes. An instructional or training program, a one-shot library instruction session, a technology training session for patrons, or staff training all greatly benefit by starting with good learning outcomes that provide structure and guide planning, execution, and assessment. Well-constructed outcomes need to be measurable so that your program or session may be assessed. Assessment helps determines the students’ or attendees’ success in learning and achieving the established outcomes and, in turn, the success of the session or program. Effective assessment results also provide useful reporting data to stakeholders whether it’s a college, university, city or county. These reports can help your library look good! Writing a good student learning outcome is fairly straightforward once you know a few simple techniques. After a brief presentation, this practical and interactive workshop will guide participants through the process of choosing the correct language and applying a formula for constructing strong student learning outcomes. Attendees will have the opportunity to develop outcomes for classes, programs or sessions they’re planning and workshop these outcomes with the presenters and other participants. Sample class situations will also be available for those without their own scenario.

Why Should I Care?: RDA and Your Library
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Sonia Archer-Capuzzo
Cataloger, Lecturer, Librarian
Freelance

Though RDA is nothing new, it is still a system that many librarians don't understand. Many catalogers who take part in workshops about RDA ask, "What's the point? Is there really anything great about RDA?" They aren't the only ones questioning the importance of RDA. Public services librarians, technology specialists, and a host of other library professionals are confused by the move to RDA. In this presentation, I will answer these questions. I will briefly discuss the changes that RDA brings to our catalog. After orienting attendees to RDA, I will focus on the potential of RDA.  I'll talk about what RDA can do now to increase usability of catalog information for patrons. I will also talk about the potential of RDA that we should all keep in mind as we develop and update our library systems. The presentation will take the form of a group discussion, with audience members encouraged to ask questions and make comments after the topic is introduced. 

WILR Breakfast
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Therese Plummer
Narrator

Sweet and Spicy! Thérèse Plummer Reads It All!

Thérèse Plummer, Earphone winner, and Audie nominee, discusses narrating books written by Charlaine Harris, Robyn Carr, Candace Bushnell, Jennifer Haigh, YA novels by Julie Kagawa and many others.  She will also discuss her work as a reader of Erotica under the pseudonym, Savannah Richards.  

Women in Technology in Libraries: a panel discussion
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Kyle White
Branch Manager
Cabarrus County Public Library
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Julie Raynor
Readers' Services Supervisor/Facilitator of Digital Download Services and Programs
High Point Public Library
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Laura Wiegand
Coordinator of Discovery Services
UNC Wilmington
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Tanya Prokrym
NC Cardinal Program Director
State Library of North Carolina
Laurie Reeves
Systems Support Librarian
State Library of North Carolina
Lynn Bertino
Library Systems Manager
Wake County Public Libraries

Information technology is one of the fastest growing U.S. industries, however women's shares of employment are lower than average for all computing occupations. Women quit the IT profession at a high rate and face hidden and overt biases and barriers. Meanwhile, the percentage of jobs held by women in almost all other sciences has increased significantly. How does this dynamic affect libraries, whose workers have been and continue to be mostly female? The panelists will briefly share their career path stories and personal experiences, then engage in a lively panel and audience discussion about the challenges and opportunities of technology librarianship. The panel will be moderated by Kyle White, secretary of the Women in Libraries Roundtable and Julie Raynor, secretary/treasurer of the Technology and Trends Roundtable.

Writing a Winning Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) Grant Application
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Raye Oldham
Federal Programs Consultant
State Library of North Carolina

This interactive day of learning and working together is just what you need to inspire ideas for your library, learn strategies for developing your LSTA project, and get started on writing a 2016-2017 LSTA grant application.  This session is for public and academic library staff interested in learning how to develop and prepare a strong application for bringing LSTA funds into their library through a Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) grant.  

This workshop will include: 

  • How to be on the same page as your funder;
  • Grant categories available for 2016-2017;
  • Tips and techniques for a successful application;
  • Examples of common mistakes; and
  • Time and assistance to begin writing an application*.

* Participants may want to bring a laptop or tablet to the session.

The State Library of North Carolina manages this federally funded, competitive grant program for eligible North Carolina libraries.  

There is no cost for registration; this session requires a minimum of 10 registrations by October 12th.

You did the Assessment. Now what? : Reviewing results and getting ready for action planning
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Kristi Zappie-Ferradino
Program Director
Edge Initiative

You've completed your Edge Assessment, but are you unsure where to go from there? Do you have questions about the Assessment? Are you ready to roll up your sleeves and get to work making technology services better in your community? Join Edge and your colleagues to discuss the Toolkit features and learn how other libraries are using them to effect change in their libraries and communities.

Topics will include:

  • Understanding your results from the Assessment and Peer Comparison Reports
  • Prioritizing your Recommendations to create a realistic Action Plan
Youth Services Section Wine and Cheese/Business Meeting
Debbie Shreve
Branch Manager
Wake County Public Libraries

Join us for a "Getting to know YSS" networking event. Meet the outgoing/incoming board, other members of the section and hear our vision as we continue to plan and grow during these changing times. Not a member of YSS? Bring us your questions, share your input and hopefully become a member. This is a registered event and space is limited. $10 for YSS members and $15 for non-members 

Info coming soon.